The following programs provided documents to participants that are archived on this page.  Documents are archived via Google Drive.  No account is required to access the documentation.  If you do not see your program's documents listed, please let us know.  

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Reframing Masculinity: Implementing Conversations with College Men

The workshop will address the issue of masculinity and its impact on actions and expectations of college men. The context of the masculine culture and socialization contributes to a culture of stereotypical behavior. By offering a different perspective on masculinity, participants can explore ways to bring about conversations among men to challenge the pervasive mindset and foster self-reflection and change.

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Promoting Awareness-of-Self Through Cultural Immersion and Service-Learning

As we aspire to increase the internationalization of higher education, practitioner self-awareness and multicultural competence will be of continued importance among student affairs professionals. Graduate preparation programs, specifically counseling-based programs, have been seeking innovative methods, most notably through cultural immersion experiences, to enhance self-awareness in order to create culturally competent practitioners. Join us as we share one university's innovative approach to bring "theory to practice” through service-learning and cultural immersion as it relates to examining emerging professionals' cultural competence.

Download Program Handout (PDF)

Practitioner to Faculty: An Examination of Narratives

Rumors abound about moving from a practitioner to joining the faculty ranks. Stories we hear often highlight the struggles rather than the successes leading us to wonder, Is a faculty role even possible? How does one thrive? This diverse panel will explore narratives of current faculty who made the successful transition from practitioner to faculty and discuss various types of faculty roles, qualifications, myths and truths of faculty life, including creating a research agenda and negotiating the job offer.  

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Student Activism as a Vehicle for Leadership Development

While student activism is certainly not a new phenomenon, the recent increase in participation presents pressing challenges for student affairs professionals. As more students continue to protest and organize on campuses across the U.S., student affairs professionals must consider the potential for student leadership development, as well as increased political and civic engagement that activism may foster. This session explores the history of student activism, and examines activism using the Social Change Model and Leadership Identity Development (LID) Theory.

Download Workshop Handout (PDF)
Download Infographic Handout (PDF)

It’s OUR Job: White Male Privilege, Positionality, and Social Justice

Shame. Guilt. Immobilization. Confusion. Frustration. Although well-intentioned, many white men fall short as allies in social justice. How do we unlearn and unfreeze? How can white men fully contribute in ways that are necessary, welcome, and affirming? This session will explore racism, white fragility, creating a curriculum of critical self-knowledge, and concrete action steps to help white men educate themselves and fulfill our responsibility to use our power and privilege to address oppression.  

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Breakfast of Champions: Professional Development on a Shoestring

When budgets are tight, professional development is usually gets cut first. You don't have to go far to find good content at a low cost - look inside your own university! Get inspired by NYIT's Breakfast of Champions professional development series and leverage faculty and staff to deliver short professional development sessions, ranging from a MBTI session to Creating a LinkedIn Profile. Engage your colleagues in an informal breakfast setting designed to supplement more formal and costly professional development experiences.

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Disability Inclusion across Student Affairs Functional Areas

One in ten college students has a disability.  Yet, published scholarship about disability in student affairs remains rare and campus services are frequently siloed, with the responsibility delegated to Disability Resources Offices.  A lack of knowledge about disability has the potential to create unwelcoming environments and a chilly campus climate for students with disabilities.  This program advances professional competencies by discussing disability topics that are salient to five student affairs functional areas.  Participants will apply this knowledge to case studies.

Download Workshop Handout (PDF)

Addressing Disability in Higher Education Using a Social Justice Perspective

All student affairs staff, not just disability resources staff, must proactively address issues facing disabled students. Presenters will introduce student affairs practitioners to the ways in which social justice principles can be applied to disability issues in higher education and stimulate their thinking about how these principles can be used in their work with students on their campuses. The presenters and audience will address examples of ableism on college campuses, their effects on students, and creating inclusive campus environments. 

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Download Universal Design Handout (DOCX)
Download Learning Outcomes Handout (DOCX)

Secrets of Onboarding: How to Effectively and Enthusiastically Welcome Staff

Great onboarding helps an employee feel welcomed, needed, and like part of the team right away. Having a standardized, thoughtful onboarding process helps institutions give all new staff a positive experience. The focus cannot be on filling out forms and getting a name tag, onboarding requires intentionality and strategy. Come learn the newest onboarding strategies.   

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WERQ Dance Fitness

WERQ (pronounced “work”) is the wildly addictive dance fitness class based on the hottest pop, rock, and hip-hop music. WERQ makes dance accessible to every level of student. Beyond being easy to follow, WERQ is an effective cardio class that feels more like a dance experience. Come get your WERQ-out on!

Download Workshop Handout (PDF)

Inspiring Personal and Ethical Foundations: The Reflective Practitioner

Student affairs professionals often juggle multiple ethical concerns on their campuses. However, many do not find the time or method for consistently reflecting on personal values, professional competencies, and resources that prepare us for ethical decision-making. In this session, we will overview guiding ethical principles and competencies in student affairs. Participants will explore ways to be self-reflective using professional codes of ethics, and they will leave with ideas and resources for becoming an intentionally ethical practitioner.    

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Using CAS for Evaluating Program Effectiveness and Student Learning

As student affairs professionals we strive to meet the needs of our students. This commitment, coupled with calls of accountability urge us to evaluate those programs and services to demonstrate their impact on student learning. The standards developed by the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) are valuable tools for these forms of assessment. In this session participants will learn how to use the standards for program review and evaluation of student learning.     

Download Workshop Handout (DOCX)

Do It Yourself CAS Program Review

Twin goals of assessment are accountability and program improvement. The CAS Standards are an essential tool for performing evaluations on your campus and can help you meet both of those goals. The standards can be used for a variety of evaluations including department review or assessing how a function is implemented across your division. During this session experienced users will provide step-by-step examples regarding how to implement different CAS standards for evaluation.   

Download Workshop Handout (DOCX)

Using New CAS Cross-functional Assessment Frameworks and Multi-Standard Self-Study Processes

Responding to user demand, CAS piloted the development of frameworks for assessing issues that transcend any one functional area. These include First Year Experience, campus safety, and high risk behaviors. They also created processes for offices responsible for multiple functional area standards to effectively and efficiently engage in self-study. This session will introduce these tools and provide direction in using them.   

Download Workshop Handout (DOCX)

Practical implications toward a more inclusive fraternity community

Recent national examples demonstrate the contentious relationship between the traditionally White fraternity system and race. This session presents narratives on race from a qualitative study with eight fraternity members who recently initiated into predominantly and traditionally White fraternities at a large, public university in the southeast. The critical constructivist approach used for this study deconstructed the ways in which Whiteness was perpetuated in hegemonic White spaces. The findings from this study provide student affairs practitioners with insight into implementing practical implications for creating a more inclusive fraternity community.   

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SCIE Ambassador Program: Cultivating Inclusion across the Health Sciences

Underrepresented students are increasingly attending institutions of higher education.  When they do, they face barriers that can impede their ability to thrive.  This is particularly true for graduate and professional students in the health sciences where minority student enrollment does not mirror demographics of the larger society.  This session will describe the SCIE Ambassador Program, an inter-professional initiative designed to promote inclusion across five Health Sciences schools at a predominately White institution.  Participants will hear details of the program, and learn strategies for implementing a similar program on their campus.

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Lessons Learned: Teaching New RAs to Avoid Predictable Pitfalls

Want a fresh way to reinvent your RA Class, training week, or staff meeting?  This session is full of great take-aways to liven up your Residence Life training program!  Get some great ideas on how you can go beyond the surface level in applying theory to training in an engaging way.  Explore the case study method of applying lessons learned from common mistakes made by RAs.  

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Pornography: What Student Affairs Professionals Need to Know

Today’s mainstream pornography is depicting more violent activity than ever. As nearly all college men and increasing numbers of women consume  pornography, what they view as healthy sexuality is being reinvented.  Come hear what you need to know about how porn is affecting your students, and learn how to help students who wish to cut down on or discontinue their use.   

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Mid-Level Community of Practice Gatherings

A vastly diverse panel of mid-level practitioners who are all rooted in student affairs and higher education will share their personal and professional career milestones with the intention of participants to have a deeper meaning of what it means to be a mid-level practitioner as well as demystified views of working as a mid-level practitioner. The discussion will also revolve around balancing personal and professional life and the supports that are available for mid-level practitioners.  

Download the 2017 MLCOP Brochure

Ready to Supervise: Developing Your Own Supervisory Style

In this presentation the presenter will provide strategies for developing competency in the area of supervision for new professionals.  Research on the issue of supervision development in higher education graduate programs has been produced and studies have acknowledged the many graduate programs are not providing adequate training or preparation in the area of supervision; this presentation will provide steps to developing a supervisory style. 

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Off-Campus Student Services: A Different & Distinct Framework

Off-Campus Student Services departments at our institutions typically focus on the needs of “commuter” students.  However Off-Campus Student Services provides support for students who live independently from their families in community housing within close proximity of campus. This is executed through programs and services that promote active, and personal responsibility in their off campus communities.  This program will examine how an Off-Campus Student Services department combines student/university needs, CAS standards, theoretical frameworks, as well as best practices to offer the necessary programs and services to students. 

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Development of the Secondary Trauma in Student Affairs Professionals Scale

Many helping professions such as counseling, social work, and K-12 education have recognized the potential negative consequences of serving in professional helping roles.  However, student affairs has lacked an empirical understanding of this phenomena within the profession. This study served to develop and validate the Secondary Trauma in Student Affairs Professionals Scale.  Using a sample of student affairs professionals (N=540), the researchers used PCA and confirmatory factor analysis to establish a four factor model.

Download the Program Documents

Moving from politically correct to authentically correct

Inclusion is  a celebrated value in student affairs, but it can often come with growing pains.  As we are trying to support others in affirming their identities, how are we being authentic and affirming to our own narratives? In this session, the presenters will explore how our own identities impact the way we experience others.  Participants will leave with greater confidence in their ability to manage the discomfort of when intentions and impact clash.

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Using a Social Justice Lens to Develop PoC Housing Programs

In this presentation we will demonstrate and explore how student affairs professionals can respond to issues of race and systems of oppression through the context of a residence life program. Antioch College has implemented a People of Color floor section as a result of student activism and concerns about campus climate. We will share the context that led to the creation of this program as well as the program structure, its impact and our assessment data.

Download the Program handout (PDF)

Inclusive reproductive health education: Intersections of race, gender, and sexuality

Current reproductive health dialogue centers cisgender, white, and heterosexual populations. As more students with marginalized gender, racial, and sexual identities are impacted by violence, student affairs educators must analyze systems of oppression. How can student affairs professionals engage in conversations about safer sex and harm reduction with queer transgender students of color? Participants will reflect on power, privilege, and white supremacy to better supporting students with marginalized identities in reproductive health and violence prevention through an intersectional and gender-equity lens.

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Graduate Orientation: Cultivate Success for On-Campus, Online, and Distance Learners

Graduate orientation at SCSU is a routinely assessed and intentionally layered experience delivered through asynchronous, synchronous, and on-campus formats. This session will explore the various campus-wide graduate orientation offerings and theories applied plus the experience of two doctoral program’s conversion of its program orientations from on-campus to hybrid format.  Through assessment of student needs and review of campus and program goals, orientation was redesigned to better meet student needs and campus goals. Participants will share ideas about orientation practices used on their campus.

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#SisterPhD: Lessons From Year Two

The doctoral journey can present unique challenges for Black women given the demographics of higher education. In this session, we will share the lessons we’ve learned as second-year doctoral students, and the opportunities and challenges presented to us by the doctoral process. This presentation centers on the significance of creating and maintaining community, building community cultural wealth, committing to writing as a priority, and moving from practitioners to scholar-practitioners as a community of Sister Scholars at varying institutions. 

Download the Program Handout (PDF)

Transformative Residential Curricula: Lessons Learned Over 10 Years

Increased attendance at ACPA’s annual Residential Curriculum Institute over the past 10 years is just one indicator that residence life programs across the country are making a shift to curricular approaches to residential education. Bold ideas on student learning and development in the residential setting are driving transformational practices worthy of reflection. This session is intended to cultivate a dynamic learning environment that features lessons learned from implementation of the residential curriculum, experience on a myriad of campuses, and original research.  

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Developing Transformational Leaders through Mentoring and Socialization

Within student affairs and academic affairs there is a need to encourage and mentor the next generation.  However, there are some misconceptions related to the roles, time commitments, and efforts of potential mentors.  In this interactive session, potential mentors and proteges will learn more about mentoring theory and best practices related to socialization into higher education environments in order to become transformational leaders.

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Emotional Intelligence Development via Mentoring at a Women’s College

This study provides insight on how mentees in a mentoring program perceive mentor behaviors as impacting their Emotional Intelligence (EI) development while examining assessed EI change via the Emotional Social Competency Inventory University Edition (ESCI-U) prior to and after participation in a mentoring program. Data was viewed through the lens of EI. The study considers the reality of mentee experiences in correlation with EI development assessed by the ESCI-U to contribute to dialogue of mentor behaviors that support mentees EI.

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Is Your Campus Undocu-Friendly? Establishing an Undocumented Student Center

This presentation will describe the development of a student community center focused on supporting undocumented students as a response to an increasing student population resulting from changes in legislation. This session will benefit participants who are interested in developing a similar resource at their respective institutions, are currently in preliminary stages of implementing a similar resource, or would like to share ways their home institutions have proactively responded to retention and graduation of undocumented students at the post-secondary level.  

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Transforming Student Affairs Practice at Community Colleges: Responding to the Completion Agenda

This program session is designed for dialogue about and idea formulation on the current reform movement in the community college section and its implications for student affairs practice. Community colleges are experiencing its highest level of national visibility among key stakeholders. In the midst of this visibility, with a focus on student retention and completion, is a requisite demand on re-examining the role of student affairs practitioners and their role in the reform movement. This session will explore ideas for change in student affairs practice at two-year institutions, within the context of the professional competencies and the national completion agenda.

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Co-curricular and athletic events work collaboratively for student success

As the only one in the country, the Illinois Skyway Collegiate Conference is committed to fostering the development of students’ specialized talents through intercollegiate athletic and co-curricular activity programs.  Eight colleges participate and compete in 4 co-curricular and 12 athletic events yearly.  We will focus on co-curricular competitions and how one could work with other colleges as well as across divisions and areas to think holistically about a student learning and how the co-curricular activities contribute to student's engagement.

Download the Program Handout

Exercising Positive Leadership

Using Positive Psychology and Appreciative Inquiry scholarship as a framework, this session highlights powerful practices that foster thriving organizations. The presenter will provide foundational ideas as well as practical applications to catalyze development both for individuals and groups.

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Students with Autism: Peer Perspectives and Helpful Strategies

Over 50,000 students with autism will enroll in college each fall, a number that is growing annually.  How are campuses responding?  A review of sixteen major higher education journals shows scant interest in this population. But strategies must begin with research.  This session will highlight a current study that looks at peer perceptions of students with autism.  The findings offer insights into developing a campus culture where students with autism are understood and more likely to be successful.

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A Curricular Approach to Year-Round RA Skill Development

This program features the curricular approach to ongoing development for Resident Assistants at the University of Delaware. Staff have developed, implemented, and assessed skill development modules that are intended to further student staff training, provide leadership development opportunities, and increase career-related applications of the Resident Assistant position. The presenters will highlight the cycle of a module from development to assessment, provide attendees with examples of module components, and offer the opportunity to develop curricular approaches that relate to respective institutions.

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Compliance & Community: Inclusive Title IX Practices for Trans/Non-Binary Students

The Department of Education (May 2016) provided specific direction to adapt our current polices and practices to meet the increasing expectations of our students and federal guidance through a more inclusive lens. This program will present the highlighted areas that require our immediate attention and successful strategies from a range of systems to move your campus forward. Topics will move from theory to application in a real campus environment including addressing resistance, understanding policy development and addressing technology.

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The Residential College Model as a Rhetorical Garbage Can

In the last three decades, the popularity of living-learning programs (LLPs) has skyrocketed, and the residential college in particular has emerged as an attractive model for four-year higher education institutions in the United States (Inkelas & Soldner, 2011). This exploratory study uses organizational theory as a framework for critically examining and explaining the history, rhetoric, and structure associated with the adoption and implementation of the residential college model at American colleges and universities.

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Embracing and Reclaiming the Scholar in Scholar-Practitioner

Student affairs practitioners are tremendous resources for knowledge on practice in the field. However, practitioners face challenges in disseminating this knowledge through scholarship. A key challenge is dissonance from a false dichotomy between student affairs scholars and practitioners, where scholars are those who do research, and practitioners practice. In this extended session, we discuss the myriad of ways practitioners can turn their professional experiences into scholarship. We also provide both support and strategies for cultivating practitioners’ scholarly curiosity.  

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Bridging the Great Divide: Creating Effective Partnerships With Faculty

Student affairs educators continue to have discourse about creating seamless learning environments to ensure student learning and success. Still, the gap between student affairs and faculty remains large. Through the personal reflections of two seasoned student affairs educators one who is a full-time, tenure-track faculty member and one who is a long-time student affairs administrator this program will decipher the academic side of the house to help graduate students, new professionals and mid-level administrators create effective outreach and partnerships with faculty. 

Download the Program Handout (PDF)

Working with Diverse Student Populations: Cultural Stress, Shedding, and Learning

According to Berry’s acculturation model, the acculturation process involves the mutual change of individuals in dominate and subordinate groups.  In a multi-site case study, findings revealed that acculturation strategies used by student affairs educators included avoiding acculturation stress by hiring a savior.  When there was no savior, participants acquiesced authority and unit loyalty, or simply relied on institutional rules to guide actions. Implications for improved multicultural competence will be brainstormed.     

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Privileged Identity Exploration: Personal Reactions and Skill Development

Grounded in the Privileged Identity Exploration (PIE) model, participants will engage in a highly interactive program. The PIE model provides a framework to understand defensive reactions to difference. Attendees will learn about the model, participate in reflective activities to gain self-awareness, and also learn strategies to apply this knowledge. Participating in this session will support attendees’ future work, ability to effectively engage in difficult dialogues, and provide skills to address defenses with others.

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Assessing Student Learning Beyond the Survey – Alternative Assessment Methods

Upon completion of a campus program, do you default to the same old satisfaction survey?  Are you overwhelmed with the assessment process and want concrete tips to generate meaningful assessments to improve student outcomes?  This session will provide an introduction to the assessment process and give attendees a template for creating their own custom assessment plan.  Attendees will become familiar with qualitative and quantitative assessment methods (other than a survey) that can easily be integrated into any student affairs division/department.  

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Acing the Interview – Tips for New Professional’s Job Search

Navigating the job search process can be overwhelming and daunting for graduate students and new professionals.  This session will provide tips on navigating this journey offering insight on both traditional and non-traditional student affairs searches.  Topics covered include: search parameters, resume and cover letter writing, networking, phone, virtual and on-campus interviews as well as salary negotiations.  Presenters include student affairs professionals at a variety of institutional types and contexts who will leave a generous amount of time for Q&A.

Download the Program Handout (PDF)

Transcending Boundaries through International Research Partnerships

Research on international higher education has grown over the past several decades. However, much of the research has been produced by American and European researchers leaving practitioners and scholars outside of those regions under-represented in the literature. The goal of this roundtable is to offer a space to discuss how to create a more inclusive field of research and broaden our perspective of what internationalization could look like on our campuses.

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Activating our Advising & Supporting Competency: A Refresher for SA Professionals

Developing strong interpersonal skills is vital to our roles as student affairs educators. Though many of us were exposed to advising, supporting, and helpings skills during our graduate programs, sometimes we stray from the original best practices. We may revert to acting as “problem solver” rather than allowing students to reflect on their concerns and solve their own issues. During this session, attendees will review the advising and supporting competency and practice these skills through interactive activities and role play.

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Enhancing Student Learning and Development in Cross-Border Higher Education

This session introduces core ideas from a recently published book, Enhancing Student Learning and Development in Cross-Border Higher Education (New Directions in Higher Education Series, 2016, Jossey-Bass Publishers) which addresses the opportunities and challenges in creating student learning and development programs and strategies that are culturally appropriate and use best practices from regions around the world. The book advocates for deeper student engagement, enhancement of learning and development, and it provides examples and tools to achieve these goals.

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Off-Campus Entrepreneurship: Forging Partnerships for Sustainable Revenue Generation

Many institutions find difficulty with generating revenue to sustain their offices' day-to-day operations. This program aims to discuss how to create pathways for sustainable revenue generation. Representatives from The University of Arkansas and The University of South Carolina’s Off-Campus Student Services offices will share their approach on revenue generation and community building with off-campus constituents.

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Supporting Students with Concerning Behaviors in Learning Communities

Among the many benefits of learning communities is the provision of support that students receive from the smaller community.  For students who need support due to psychiatric disabilities or demonstration of concerning behaviors, these programs can be particularly helpful.  This session will share information from an in-depth case study of a learning community that emphasizes support, particularly for those students whose behaviors indicate an increased need.

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Mental Health is Everyone’s Business: A Primer for SA Leaders

Student mental health is everyone’s business—it impacts all of us in Student Affairs and is an important component of overall well-being.  In this interactive program, an overview of common mental health issues on campus, data regarding trends and presenting concerns of counseling center clients, and guidance regarding the role of the non-therapist on campus will be provided.   A discussion of ways participants can foster a community-based approach to college mental health, one which involves the entire campus, will be facilitated.

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Building the Bridge Between the First and Second Year Experience

With increasing attention being paid to second-year students and their unique needs, institutions are presented with the opportunity to create a seamless and integrated transition between the first and second-year experience.  Attendees will reflect on the services, opportunities and high impact practices that their institution focuses in the first and/or second year.  The presenters will share the framework developed at The Ohio State University for assisting both academic and student affairs staff in the intentional design of their programs and differentiation for first and second year audiences. 

Download the informational PDF

A Story Untold: Asian American Greek Letter Organizations

The history of collegiate fraternal organizations can be traced over the past two centuries in America. But what is known about Asian American fraternal organizations? Three researchers have begun a study to determine the impact these organizations have on its members’ identity development. This session will review the history, formation, and identity of today’s Asian American fraternal organizations. Attendees will also have the opportunity to understand methods and original qualitative research and models to better advise students that are interested in membership in fraternal organizations, as well as gain cultural competency on the relevance of these organizations and their experiences. 

Download the informational PDF

Who gets to choose? Complicating fluid identities in higher education

Are social identities fixed? Are they fluid? This session will utilize a critical framework to examine the  social construction of identity in higher education. Using critical trans politics and critical race theory, we will explore fluid gender, racial, and sexual identities by engaging the question of if/when/how identity is a choice. This dialogue will interrogate fluid identity from a theoretical lens and generate practical implications for administrators relating to mattering, marginality, and transformational justice.

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Re-Conceptualizing Student Success: Graduate Students Using the Anti-Deficit Achievement Framework

In this study, journal entries from a graduate-level course were used to explore how exposing Graduate Student Affairs Educators to asset-based perspectives on student success using Harper’s (2010) anti-deficit achievement framework enhanced their thinking and practice.  In collaboration with the course instructor, participants engaged in critical participatory action research and identified how they perpetuated individualized notions of success, became conscious of dominant narratives on collegiate success, and sought to integrate anti-deficit perspectives in their practice.

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The Cost of Title IV Compliance: NASFAA’s Standards of Excellence

Compliance with federal financial aid rules and regulations is an institution-wide responsibility.  If your school’s operations are found out of compliance by the U.S. Department of Education (ED), the costs can be very high.  Not only can ED impose monetary fines of up to $27,500 per violation, it can also publish your findings for anyone to see, which can affect your school’s public reputation.  How can your school reduce the risk of compliance findings?

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Presentation Notes
Handout 1
Handout 2
Handout 3

Trans*forming Institutional Policies and Practices: Creating Trans-Affirming College Environments

This program will acquaint attendees with trans aggressions that occur across college campuses, discuss the importance of creating trans friendly college communities, investigate case studies to enhance awareness, and provide current initiatives being used across the nation at different colleges and universities to dismantle trans oppression. Activities and dialogue will allow attendees to critically examine the need for more progressive policies that support trans students in the collegiate environment and specifically within their own institutional contexts.  

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Secondary Traumatic Stress and the Student Affairs Professional

College students have increasingly reported incidents of psychological trauma.  Lacking adequate staffing and resources, college student personnel increasingly act as first responders.  This interactive session aims to assist student services professionals of all levels in practically exploring how student trauma impacts their personal and professional identities, and how to develop cultures of resilience as they are asked to support students experiencing trauma. 

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Self-Determination in Transitioning First-Year College Students with and without Disabilities

This session will share the findings of a research project that explored levels of self-determination in transitioning first-year college students using the MAP-Works Fall Transition Survey.  Gaining an understanding of how levels of self-determination differ among different incoming student groups (students with/without disabilities) can help success and retention strategists directly target interventions to students at risk and most likely to benefit.  The session will present a discussion of key findings as well as recommendations for practice and future research.

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Evaluating and Scaling up International Education Initiatives at Community Colleges

Have you ever wondered how to evaluate and increase institutional buy-in regarding international education on your campus?  A team on our campus did just that which resulted in scaling up our international education programming by creating a mission, vision, and action goals.  It led to a collaboration with Soliya to bridge campus students with those around the world.  This session will provide strategies to increase institutional buy-in and create a culture to continuously improve international education on your campus.

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Can We Talk About That? Preparing Staff for Religious and Worldview Conversation

Religious and worldview identity and diversity are at the forefront of national conversation. With this in mind, there are educators working to create training opportunities for professional colleagues and student paraprofessional staff to prepare them for interfaith engagement. This session will examine different approaches to training, and create space for participants to explore some of the nuance of talking about religion and worldview with their peers and students.

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Creating a Culture of Evaluation and Assessment through Logic Models

As campus stakeholders have sought to improve student and institutional outcomes, it has become imperative for practitioners to work within a culture of evaluation and assessment. This presentation introduces logic models as a framework for evaluation and how they are conducive to evidence-based practices on college campuses. The presentation will cover (a) logic model basics, (b) logic models as an evaluation approach, (c) logic model creation, (d) logic models in practice, and (e) logic models in federal grant applications.

Blank Logic Model Handout
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Mapping Inside the Box: Designing Social Justice Education

Arguably one of the most critical issues in higher education and student affairs, practitioners need to maximize the effectiveness of social justice education initiatives. We’ll introduce an example of an intentionally designed social justice education workshop for academic advisors, an overview of the social justice education design analysis grid that you can adapt for your campus, with tangible training and teaching resources to maximize your learning and efforts incorporating student development and learning style theories, and needs assessment techniques. 

Thinking Inside PDF
Design Analysis Grid
Content and Process Paradigms

How ACPAgrow and Mentoring Impacts Our Student Affairs Practice

Mentoring experiences are initiated by establishing a trusting relationship; cultivating desired learning goals, and redefining new directions for our professional career paths. Mentoring provides learning opportunities for student affairs faculty/staff to develop skills and knowledge. This session will outline research on mentoring among ACPA members from the ACPAgrow program. Participants will gain evidence-based practices and considerations for developing a mentoring initiative at their own institution, and might consider volunteering for a mentoring experience of their own with the ACPAgrow program.

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Examining Our Student Affairs Online and Networked Communities of Practice

Online networking and digital identity development is part of the Student Affairs professional experience. In higher education, being connected helps us learn, share knowledge, develop skills, and foster community. This session will outline the research on networked communities of practice among SA practitioners and scholars, and share findings of how the online experience impacts personal and professional development while also supporting our work on campus, within professional affiliations, and in the field of student affairs.  

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Using Arts and Writing Activities to Facilitate Students' Identity Exploration

Arts activities (narrative/creative writing, visual artmaking, music, theatre/improv, movement, etc.) can powerfully catalyze students' exploration of the complexities of their own and others' individual and cultural identities, resulting in increased self-awareness and understanding of those unlike themselves. I will provide examples from my research and discuss how student affairs practitioners can use these activities in residential halls and multicultural, wellness, and career centers. Come ready to share your ideas!

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Examining the Role of Parental Involvement with First-Generation Latinx Students

First-generation, Latinx students have great respect for their parents’ perspectives about education. Consequently, parents can influence students’ college decisions and it is imperative to examine Latinx parental involvement. Grounded in the framework of Community Cultural Wealth (Yosso, 2005), this presentation will help participants understand Latinx culture in relation to education and develop programs to engage Latinx students and their parents.

Download the PResentation Slides PDF
LN Resource Guide for Undocumented Students

Developing Competency Based Assessment through Integrated Planning Processes

Data driven decisions are earmarks of effective units.  Through an interactive session the presenters will provide an in-depth review of the ACPA/NASPA Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (AER) Professional Competency outcomes and identify strategies for effective implementation.  Integrated planning processes linking assessment, outcomes, competencies, best practices, and key components essential to continuous improvement processes will be highlighted to provide greater perspective.  Attendees will enhance their knowledge of this competency, and its interconnectivity to various institutional improvement processes.

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Intentionally Creating or Pursuing Purposeful Internship Experiences

Internships benefit participants, but also give internship providers opportunities for collaboration, growth, and fresh perspectives. This session identifies best practices for planned internships that benefit the providers and participants, as well as tools and key constructs for optimization.  Presenters will explore applications of Jones’ Reconceptualized Model of Multiple Dimensions of Identity, and Baxter-Magolda’s Self-Authorship Theory to internships. Attendees will discover resources and the benefits of structured experiences utilizing intentionality, reflection, and competencies leading to successful exchanges.

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The Role of a University College on Student Engagement

This presentation explores the statistical impact of a university (first-year) college on student engagement variables from the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) implemented University College in Fall 2006 with goals to improve student success, engagement, and retention. A heavy focus was placed on improving student engagement measures, with 7 out of 10 expected outcomes coming from NSSE data sources. During this presentation, attendees will learn about VCU’s University College and how it affected student engagement.

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Telling Our Story - Chapter 1 Conversations with 25 senior student affairs professionals

Student Affairs is an often misunderstood profession. Professionals in this field play unique roles at colleges and universities intersecting multiple identities as educator, administrator, advisor, coach and ambassador. This study is being conducted with senior student affairs leaders in North Carolina in celebration of the NCCPA’s 50th anniversary.  By it's completion it will include all 50 four-year institutions in North Carolina.  This session represents the half-way point of the study which has been conducted in case-study format.

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RA Compensation: A Social Justice Approach

This past summer, Miami University completed a RA compensation benchmarking study. Over 70 schools across the nation were called to find how they compensate their residential student leaders. Using a social justice lens to analyze this data, the presentation will show trends across the nation, incorporate experiences from RAs, and provide insight into how the compensation of our residential student leaders can impact inclusion, diversity, and equity within our offices.

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Examining a “Disability & Dialogue Series” - Reflections, Rewrites, and Renovations

“Disability & Dialogue Series” was organized in fall 2015 exploring disability identity and community in context with the dialogue process of suspending judgments, deep listening, reflection and inquiry, and identifying assumptions (Nagada, 2004). Affirming the philosophy, “nothing about us, without us,” we consulted with the Disability Resource Center in recruitment of participants and the planning of the sessions (Charlton, 1998). We will share our reflections, what we would rewrite, and what we would renovate for the future.

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Gaining a Global Perspective through Short-Term Study Abroad Programs

Student development and learning is a cornerstone of professional learning and growth for student affairs master’s students. Gaining a global perspective is a great way to increase the professional understanding of multiculturalism and global education for these emerging professionals. Participants of the BGSU New Zealand Study Tour learned about a new culture, and crafted new lens to view themselves as professional in a global context. This presentation will demonstrate the value of study tours, and the perspective and knowledge graduate students, new professionals, and faculty can gain by participating in a study tour.    

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Reliability and validity 101: Applying measurement to student affairs assessment

Assessment practice in student affairs continues to grow and evolve towards a culture that values use of results for improvement. To effectively use results for improvement, however, an understanding of measurement concepts is needed. Currently, there are very few examples of measurement concepts geared toward the student affairs practitioner. In this interactive session, participants will develop a deeper understanding of key measurement concepts such as reliability and validity, as well as discuss why they are imperative for student affairs assessment.

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Telling the Story of your Division’s Impact

It has never been more important for senior leaders to be able to articulate the impact of their division on students and the institution. This session explores how senior leaders can craft the story of their division’s impact, and then design a division-wide assessment strategy to provide the evidence to effectively tell that story. This session is for intermediate or advanced practitioners who lead/oversee multiple units and/or are charged with coordinating assessment across multiple units.

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The Neglected Majority: Supporting Commuter Students

While commuter students make up the majority of the college student population, their needs are often overlooked. This program highlights the differing needs of commuter students, and how one office worked with campus partners to create a “web of support” for students, with a specific focus on first-year commuter students.  This session will outline innovative programming and resources that better supports the needs of first-year commuter students, leading to an increase in student satisfaction and higher sense of belonging.   

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The Impact of Modern Issues on Ethical Decision Making

Student affairs professionals negotiate ethical dilemmas every day.  Sometimes the decision-making path is clear, but often there are multiple, competing paths and degrees of “rightness” and “wrongness.”  This presentation includes a description of the model written by the presenters for the Ethical Professional Practice chapter in the 2017 edition of Student services:  A handbook for the profession.  Participants will apply the model to several case studies, and an ethical dilemma of their own.

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A Critical Examination of the First-Year Student-Athlete Experience

While student-athletes face many of the same experiences as any first-year student, there are also unique challenges they must address. Per most NCAA policies, any student practicing or participating in a sport is considered a student-athlete. However, for most Division I academic policies, student-athletes are only students who receive athletic scholarships. What difference does this distinction have on their success? This session will use findings from a national study to explore the experiences of first-year student athletes. 

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Intervention of Academic Crises: Helping Students Persist

While some professionals in higher education hold a broad range of helping skills, others must acquire helping skills on the job. When students encounter an academic crisis, they often seek refuge in advising or student support. In this session, different types of academic crises will be discussed and intervention models will be shared. Attendees will acquire theoretical knowledge specific to crisis counseling and skills for executing an intervention model. Resources for culturally effective helping will be shared.

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Furthering Student Development through Collaborations with Academic Affairs

Holistic student development goes beyond traditional boundaries of student affairs professionals. Colleagues from around campus must engage to achieve this universal goal. This engagement includes collaboration with colleagues in academic affairs. Participants will explore factors influencing relationships between student affairs and academic affairs; investigate application of student development theories to academic settings; examine the application of student development in academic areas, such as undergraduate research; and discuss advantages and limitations of student development theories in academic settings.

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Academic Probation: An Engaging Online Class with Results

At the University of North Carolina at Greensboro students on academic probation are required to participate in an online course titled: Reclaim, Regain, and Recover. The course is designed to supplement student’s course schedule with additional academic and life skills that promote academic success.  Each week students watch an introduction video, work through an interactive module, and complete a short quiz. Topics in the course cover Academic Policy, University resources, wellness, communication, and goal setting. 

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Two Generations of Community College Deans: “Baby Boomers” And “GenXers”

Today’s two-year colleges are changing workplaces with changing workforces.  Numbers of community-college leaders, mostly Baby Boomers, are reaching retirement and a surge of new leaders, mostly GenXers, are moving into their offices. Two-year deans, in particular, are middle-managers with a direct impact on day-to-day work-life. Using the same generational theories we apply to our work with students, this program presents new qualitative research findings about leadership styles, visions, and practices across familiar Boomers and the new wave of GenXer deans. 

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Developing, Implementing, and Enhancing an Asian American Mentor Program

UIC’s Asian American Resource and Cultural Center (AARCC) and Global Asian Studies (GLAS) offer the Asian American Mentor Program (AAMP) which supports the recruitment, retention, and graduation of identified Asian American and English language learner undergraduates. Open to first-year and transfer students, AAMP provides a supportive community, assistance throughout their first semester, and collaborative engagement by various departments to enhance student development, academic success, and career development.  

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Expanding Social Connectedness Among Latino Male Collegians: A Community Cultural Wealth Perspective

Latino males are underrepresented at U.S. postsecondary institutions. This session addresses this education crisis by examining how Latino male achievers experienced social connectedness. Two asset-based theories are used to explore how cultural wealth enhanced Latino males’ social connectedness at a selective, PWI. Attendees will explore how these theories can be used to inform research, policies, and practices that support Latino males in higher education.  

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Studying abroad in Malaysia and Singapore: HESA Graduate Students’ Perspectives

Higher Education and Student Affairs (HESA) masters’ students from Western Michigan University (WMU) studied abroad in Malaysia and Singapore in May of 2016. This poster highlights some of their experiences and the connection to the ACPA/NASPA Professional Competencies, as well as the CAS Professional Standards for education abroad programs and services. The overall importance for professional preparation abroad will be discussed, as well as recommendations from the presenters for other HESA (and related) graduate students choosing to study abroad.

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#Werk: Student Employment as a H.I.P for Commuter Students

Implementing and measuring high-impact practices among commuter student populations involves a bit of nuance.  Learn about how to combat the stigma of the commuter student experience by exploring student employment as a high-impact practice and engagement mechanism for commuters.  Participants will learn about quantitative correlates between student employment and retention at CU Denver, and relevant variables considered.  Participants will leave with tangible assessment, evaluation, and programmatic tools to cultivate and grow student employment curriculum and support in student professional development.  

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Embracing Spirituality, Religion, and Secularity Within Student Affairs

In this session we will share a case study of a Spirituality, Religion, and Secularity course in a student affairs preparation program.  The influence of the course has spread across our institution and beyond, as the class attendees gained knowledge and confidence in this area.  We will share where this knowledge has taken them and how it is affecting undergraduates and community members.  Our goal is to inspire more graduate courses and programming related to religious diversity and interfaith engagement.

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Working with Boards: Effectively and Ethically Collaborating with External Partners

Senior student affairs leaders often have the opportunity or obligation to work with high level boards. These external partners can have a strong influence on the direction of the institution in the areas of governance, fundraising, alumni engagement, parent involvement, and functional area priorities. Yet few avenues exist to learn how to do this work effectively and ethically. This session discusses the types of boards, challenges and opportunities, and strategies to achieve positive outcomes in working with these partners. 

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Developing and Division-wide Learning Outcomes

The Division of Student Affairs at Case Western Reserve University recently designed comprehensive learning outcomes to inform division-wide storytelling, planning and change. Inclusive of more than 200 programs and services, our outcomes encompass the work of over 15 departments. Follow us through the process of developing our learning outcomes and assessment plan. Learn about our challenges, successes, and strategies for streamlining the process. Participants will leave with tangible examples of templates, timelines, assessment measures, and other easily-adaptable materials. 

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Woke Womxnhood: Cultivating Critical Consciousness in Higher Education

Wokeness is critical consciousness of systemic oppression. This session expands on three woke womxn’s of color experiences with intersectional racism and sexism in student affairs and higher education graduate programs. The presenters, an Asian American, African American, and Latina, will share their journeys of cultivating a community in order to disrupt the recycled discourse of intersectional oppression and inspire empowerment. Attendees will reflect on grassroots and institutional tactics for cultivating supportive communities for woke womxn of color in higher education.

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We Are Woke Womxn of Color: A Collaborative Critical Autoethnography

Wokeness is the beautiful and deeply painful consciousness of systemic oppression. This critical collaborative autoethnography examines how three woke womxn of color experience intersectional racism and sexism in and out of the academy.  An Asian American, African American, and Latina share the criticality of wokeness, reflecting on the role of woke agents, duality of wokeness, and the journey of cultivating a community of sista scholars in an oppressive educational system.

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Organizational Perspective on Implementing the Residential Curriculum Approach: Dissertation Study

How does a college or university housing department adopt and adapt to a new curricular approach?  This qualitative descriptive case study describes how one, mid-size, co-educational residence life department in the Midwestern region of the United States adopted the residential curriculum approach based on “The 10 Essential Elements of a Residential Curriculum” as discussed at the ACPA – College Student Educators International’s annual Residential Curriculum Institute (RCI).  This study is the first empirical research published on the residential curriculum approach.  

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Meaningful Mentoring: Engaging Student Leaders through Academic Mentorship Programs

A team of presenters will share a comprehensive view of the administration of three mentorship programs in an academic support setting.   The presenters will facilitate discussions with guided questions about mentorship programs – from conceptualization, training, and implementation to assessment and advancement.  Participants will be encouraged to collaborate with others to share their experiences and reflect on how such programs could be adapted to their functional areas.  Future initiatives and resources will also be shared.

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Diversity, Inclusion, and Professional Identity for Higher Education, Medical, and Dental Students

Despite the well-established importance of providing opportunities in which students learn about diversity and social justice, best practices are not frequently compared and contrasted across different types of graduate and professional programs. This session will explore curricular and other learning experiences that have been designed to cultivate the ACPA/NASPA “Social Justice and Inclusion” competency, in addition to “Communication and Interpersonal Skills” by the American Dental Education Association and “Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies” by the Association of American Medical Colleges.

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Tell Me More: Inspiring Customer Service in a Developmental Student Affairs World

Student affairs professionals are often left in a liminal space between development and helpful service.  Many professionals face the challenge of integrating customer service without detracting from the developmental processes of our field.  This presentation seeks to bridge this gap and equip attendees with a new perspective on helpfulness and customer service in relation to higher education.  Attendees will learn ways to incorporate service trainings for staff and implement a service culture in their work.

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Leveraging Lessons Learned via a Lending Library

We can all agree that the best retention strategies are those that impact students BEFORE they know they need them. This presentation will discuss the value of developing a Lending Library program on your campus as well as provide you with the tools to do so. Not only do students walk away with a free textbook, but they also have a connection in their campus network and an understanding of their academic and financial standing.

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Unpacking Social Issues in our World Today: Insights and Strategies

This session will draw upon the insights of mid-level practitioners and scholars to unpack a number of contemporary social issues affecting college students and environments. Specifically, they will reflect upon incidents that occurred during the summer of 2016, and how they managed the aftermath on their campuses and dealt with constituents with varying levels of exposure and understandings of these events. The session will conclude with strategies for holding discussions and engaging our campus communities, in productive and action-oriented ways.

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Professional Competency and Self-Awareness: When Perception meets Reality

Professional competency is crucial for student affairs practitioners, regardless of educational background, functional area, or experience. ACPA/NASPA provide us with guidance in the form of the Professional Competency Areas.  Equally important is one’s self-awareness of their level of professional competency.  However, what happens when self-awareness is lacking and we perceive ourselves to be more competent than we truly are? Using data from a recent study, this interactive presentation will highlight the relationship between self-awareness and competencies.  Does perception equal reality?

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#CiteASista: A Framework for Reimagining Digital Counterspaces

Black women’s bodies are often the backs upon which many higher education organizations thrive, yet our voices are often silenced and contributions are taken lightly. Many Black women find their research, speeches, and ideas necessarily presented in academia, while simultaneously facing exclusions from larger academic culture.  This session discusses the creation and formation of #CiteASista, as an epistemology and practice drawing attention to disparities in crediting, centering, and attributions, and provides a framework for operationalizing online platforms for community building and consciousness raising.    

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Living Environments and Student Engagement: Research Findings and Implications

While past research points to various benefits of living on campus, student affairs professionals should consider and adapt to contemporary changes in on-campus living. This session reviews findings from a set of questions that were developed in collaboration with ACUHO-I and appended to the National Survey of Student Engagement. Findings include the relationship between living environments (facilities, programs, staff, etc.) with engagement and perceived gains in learning and development. The session encourages discussion on how these findings can inform practice.

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Nurturing Kindness Based Leadership to Create & Sustain Innovative Work Cultures

Even as incivility in the workplace is on the rise, leaders must set the tone for productive work culture by being kind. Leading through kindness based principles such as: allowing for mistakes, complimenting achievements, and recognizing employees for their individual strengths ensures that university teams can remain innovative and productive.

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An overview and application of effect coding to study race

Typically, quantitative researchers studying college outcomes by student race use dummy coding with whites as the reference group. This practice has been criticized as exclusionary and even an act of subtle micro-aggression.  Following Mayhew and Simonoff’s recent works (2015), we describe an alternative method called effect coding to examine racial differences in college students’ racial attitudes. This session will be helpful for practitioners and scholars interested in quantitative methods for studying race in higher education. 

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Build With Them, Not For Them: Students as Culture-Building Partners

When student affairs educators conceptualize student life as a product we deliver to students, we risk teaching and learning lessons we do not intend about the rigidity of our roles and relationships and the limits of human agency and democracy itself. Relying on Bandura’s self-efficacy theory, we describe an alternative culture-building and agency-enhancing approach that we enact at UMBC to foster co-curricular learning, in which students are viewed as valuable partners and producers in co-creating student life.

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Social Justice Goes Digital: Creating Your Online Identity

Looking at traditional student development theories through a digital lens, attendees will be exposed to multiple online resources available to focus their social media identity towards that of a social justice advocate and ally.

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Fostering Potential in Foster Youth Students

Do you remember your first day at college? How about the first time you felt like an independent adult? For many foster youth students, these two milestones in life are achieved simultaneously. As an underrepresented and underserved student population, many institutions struggle to support these students throughout their difficult transition to college. This program will expose the numerous obstacles faced by foster youth students, discuss best practices for supporting these students, and share a blueprint for creating targeted programs.

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Exploring the Relationship between Student Conduct and Attrition

Students that are involved in high risk behaviors often do not persist in college. Can the same be said for students that participate in the conduct process? This session will share research on how one college studied its first year students that went through the conduct process to see if they dropped out more often than their peers. By understanding the likelihood of first year student attrition colleges can support at-risk students before they leave. 

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Academic and Career Development: Rethinking Advising Strategies for Asian Americans

Academic and career issues have been shown to be particularly central to Asian American students’ sense of self and well-being. But is the individualistic approach of most career theories and academic advising practices effective?  What does the research say? Participants will engage in case study discussions and learn strategies for supporting students who are juggling family pressures and societal expectations while developing their own academic and career interests. 

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Unveiling the Hidden Curriculum: Strategies for Black Women in HESA

This seminar centers on navigating the job search process from the perspectives of Black women in higher education.  Using extant literature and narratives from seasoned and mid-level professionals, the presenters will explore common themes and experiences Black women face in seeking faculty and practitioner-based positions in colleges and universities.  Core concepts include key considerations during the application process, identifying non-negotiables, job talks and interviews, negotiation techniques, critical determinates in establishing proper fit, and offsetting hidden bias and campus politics. 

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A Health Care Approach to Multicultural Education: Multicultural Leisure Education

The Broaden and Build Theory provides a framework for Multicultural Leisure Education (MLC).  MLC uses the Broaden and Build Theory as a foundation for creating physically, socially, and emotionally healthy spaces in academia.  The theory is a resource for student affairs professionals to help understand how positive emotions decrease the stress response and enhance personal resources for students as they explore marginalized and privileged identities.  Positive emotions promote long term health outcomes, which have a significant impact on learning and success in higher education.   

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Latino Male Mental Health and Implications for their College Success

Latino college students have a higher incidence of untreated mental illnesses than many other groups. Cultural norms, machismo, stigma, level of acculturation, and historical perspectives about treatment often interfere with this population’s accessing of necessary mental health services. This session will review the literature and provide meaningful theory-to-practice and best practices in mental health access and support strategies to effectively engage and support Latino students in all types of colleges reach their personal and academic goals.  

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Assessing institutional connectedness using social network analysis

Relationships among students, among student affairs educators, and between the two groups have demonstrated importance for engagement, learning, development, and graduation.  Yet we do not often assess these connections and communities in a relational way.  This session will introduce you to social network analysis as a means of mapping relational networks and connecting them to desired outcomes for student and administrative communities.

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Chinese Students Crisis Management

This session regards Chinese Students Crisis Management on American colleges/universities campuses. The presentation highlights mental health, sexual misconduct, academic dishonesty, car accidents, and student fatality. The number of Chinese students as a percentage of all international students has surged significantly over the past decade. It is essential for student affairs professional to be capable to respond and resolve Chinese students’ crises on campus in a timely manner.

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Visioning for Future Direction: Strategic Planning with Purpose

Using an inclusive process and the campus strategic planning framework, The Career Center ensured the goals, initiatives, and metrics outlined in its 2015-20 Strategic Plan were aligned with Division of Student Affairs and supported the institutional vision for the future. This interactive session will demonstrate the value of aligning a unit-specific plan with the division and the campus. You will experience and learn a planning process that encourages innovative and future thinking while also engaging staff and creating buy-in.

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Understanding Military Culture and Its Impact on Student Veterans’ Development

This presentation offers a seven-principle definition of military culture set within a conceptual framework of developmental ecology (Bronfenbrenner, 1993; Bronfenbrenner & Morris, 2006).  Participants will learn how the mesosystem of military culture deeply impacts both the development and learning of student veterans long after separation from active service.  Exercises and discussions during the session, along with qualitative data from two studies, will give participants tools to apply to their professional interactions with student veterans in the classroom and campus community.

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Transforming Experience: Motivational Interviewing to Implement Change

As advisors working with professional students, our approach with students sometimes needs to be less prescriptive requiring us to tap into a student's intrinsic motivation to elicit change, lessen indecision, and commit to their pathway.  Motivational Interviewing helps us coach students to take actions that will result in positive changes in their academic and personal wellness.  This presentation will define Motivational Interviewing (MI); explain when MI would be useful in Student Affairs; and determine questions to ask and strategies to use. ?

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Faculty Attitudes and Behaviors That Help First-Year Students Thrive

Thriving students are fully engaged psychologically, socially, and academically, making the most of their college experience.  This session will explore the results of a study of first-year seminar instructors whose students exhibited the highest levels of thriving at the end of the semester, with particular attention to students of color.  The attitudes and behaviors of these faculty will be described, leading to recommendations for creating inclusive environments conducive to first-year student thriving.

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Mapping For Success: Using Curricular Techniques to Enhance Student Engagement

Limited time and resources make it imperative that programs and initiatives support our intended learning outcomes.  Using curricular approaches to the design of non-classroom learning experiences can help validate their value as meaningful educational experiences, particularly when working with faculty.  This session will detail how we adapted curriculum mapping techniques to assess learning outcomes and strategies that support student engagement within our learning communities.

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Up, Down, All Around: Managing Change from the Middle

Middle managers in higher education are critical to effecting institutional change. Managing change effectively requires an ability to manage up, down, and across college / university divisions. Most student affairs and higher education professionals, however, have limited education or training on how to manage change or successfully navigate “life in the middle.” This session will examine the challenges of, and provide strategies for, managing institutional change as middle managers.

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Get it together, damn it!: Racism in student affairs supervision

Supervision is everywhere in our field, yet we rarely talk about how to supervise effectively and the role our social identities play in supervision.  Join me for this engaging session about the roles of race and racism in supervision. I will share results of my dissertation research that explores the experiences of professionals of color supervised by White people.  You’ll leave with tangible ways to be a more inclusive, socially just supervisor and consider how racial identity affects supervision.

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Freedom of Speech and Professional Values: The Recent Collision

The resurgence of college student activism has created a dilemma for many Student Affairs professionals: How can we simultaneously uphold legal mandates and support students, especially when our personal values are challenged? In this extended session, we will have time to engage in a case study that illustrates this dilemma, review guidelines for managing events with expressive speech, and hear advice from SA pros who have experience navigating these challenges.

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Be prepared, let's start here!

With increased incidents of violence around the world and on college campuses including UCLA, presenters will share their UCLA’s crisis management and emergency preparedness strategies, practices, and lessons learned. Participants will complete a preparedness readiness guide to assess their preparedness and then put them to practice in exercises. Participants will take away lessons learned, practice strategies, and a guide to reference for emergencies at their campus.

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Are You What You Read? Assigned Readings Influence on Identity

Reading theory has shown that students make meaning of texts in a variety of ways. This study looks to understand the role reading plays in making meaning of identity for women in STEM. Taking a phenomenological approach, 11 students were interviewed and asked to draw their own identity using Multiple Dimensions of Identity as a framework. A complex relationship between reading and identity is identified and suggestions for improving pedagogy, particularly for faculty, advisors, and student affairs professionals are shared.

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What's Feminism Got To Do With Leadership Development?

This session will engage critical dialogue about leadership development and how dominant conceptions of leadership, that are embedded with andro- and ethnocentrism may limit those who access and advance in leadership positions. We advance, through this session, that feminist and other theoretical lenses are needed to disrupt dominant conceptions of, and thus developmental programming for, leadership.  The panelists’ perspectives will problematize what it means to be a leader and how we develop leaders.

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An Examination of Transgender Students' Mental Health

The current session is focused on an analysis of transgender college students' mental health using the American College Health Association's annual survey.  Presenters will share results that compare the mental health of transgender students to their heterosexual and cisgender peers from a nationally representative sample of college students.  Mental health issues addressed in the data set include depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and suicidal ideations, among others.  Participants will engage in discussion about how these issues relate to various campus environments.

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Work (Out) Smarter, Not Harder:Associations between Student Learning and Recreation

Campus recreation centers offer opportunities to engage students to live balanced lives.  Recent research supports that engagement in campus recreation programs and services can enhance student learning as well.  This session will discuss research studies that demonstrate positive associations with recreation participation and student learning, measured by recreation facility usage and program participation.  The session will also discuss how links to student learning can support campus investments in recreation and respond to policymakers who are critical of recreation expansions.

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Engaging in Career Development with Arts & Sciences Students

Arts & Sciences (A&S) students often believe the myth that career centers only serve business majors. The presenters will discuss the importance of educating A&S students how to market their skills and see their value in the workplace. This session will also showcase ways to increase employer awareness of the benefits of hiring A&S students. Presenters will share best practices by providing concrete examples that attendees can use to create their own targeted events for A&S majors on their campus.

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TRANSferring Knowledge at Linn-Benton Community College

This session will present on the TRANSferring Knowledge initiative undertaken by Linn-Benton Community College with grant support from the Coalition for LGBT Awareness. Presenters will share how the program involved faculty, local healthcare providers, and students. Participants will review curriculum developed for incorporation into courses with cultural literacy outcomes. Initiative educational material and curriculum will be available to participants. The session will involve participants in sharing their own campus efforts and feedback concerning future directions of this initiative.

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What’s my Role? Using Group Dynamics for Students’ Holistic Growth

This session is designed for leaders of student groups—anything from clubs to academic classes.  Many enter this work hoping to be a mentor, but in the rush to “get the job done,” students’ personal growth is too often lost.  Group dynamics is a research-based model for incorporating holistic growth into your group.  This session includes an overview of group dynamics and roles, structured exercises for reflecting on a group you lead, and a small group experience to experiment with ideas discussed.

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Relief pitcher: Stepping up to the plate to serve as an interim leader

No industry is immune to turnover, extended leaves of absence (planned/unplanned), and organizational shifts. Often units and the larger institution need to fill these positions on short notice and hiring a new employee is not an option. During this session, the presenters will discuss leadership changes that affect an organizational unit, through an interim lens. They will explore the unique challenges that supervisors face when they have interim leadership on their team, and also how to navigate leadership when called upon to serve.

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Respect My (Prior) Experiences: Navigating a Non-Traditional Student Affairs Path

What does it mean to be the 30 year old hall director when you are just beginning your student affairs career? How can supervisors support new professionals who come to the field with a significant amount of prior professional experience? How do the professional development, mentorship, and daily work needs of non-traditional path professionals differ from their younger counterparts? Four professionals who entered the field in non-traditional ways will share their experiences that answer these questions.

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Assistance Animals on Campus

US campuses have seen an increase in the request from students to have service animals, therapy animals, and emotional support animals. It has become more important to understand where animals are allowed and to learn more about how these animals may interact with you and other students. This session is designed to give participants perspectives on what they should know about Assistance Animals, what laws are involved in making these accommodations, and who should be involved in the conversations.

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Multiracial Perspectives in Higher Education: Pushing the Limits of Discourse

This panel session features practitioners and graduate students who self-identify as multiracial. Each of the panelists are affiliated with ACPA’s MultiRacial Network and hold a wide array of positions across the country within Student Affairs. Our session will help push the limits of discourse on multiraciality in higher education and we will share our perspectives on: monoracism, fluid gender identities, multiracial student organizing, and how to navigate higher education as multiracial individuals in monoracial spaces.

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The Bridge to Success: The How To of a STEM Summer Bridge Program

There continues to be high attrition of first year students within engineering related disciplines. At the Speed School of Engineering, University of Louisville, we sought to combat this through the creation of a Summer Bridge Program.  Through intentional learning outcomes, collaboration with academic and student affairs, and a critical eye towards student development, we believe the program was a success. We seek to give other professionals a resource and guide from our successful and innovative practices.

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Enhancing Graduate Assistant Experience through a Residential Curriculum

This spotlight session will highlight the Assistant Residence Hall Director Curriculum started at Kent State University in an effort to provide consistent, standard experiences between all eleven graduate students. The curriculum highlights student development theory, professional competencies, and evaluation materials.

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The Productivity Circle – Collaborative Work to Empower Students with ADHD

Increase your ability to build collaborative relationships across student development units as you advocate for students with ADHD. Presenters will explain how to create, market, and lead a collaborative psychoeducational/skill-building group for students with ADHD. Detailed curriculum plans and numerous resources will be shared.  Gather valuable information to design groups for students with ADHD that fit your departmental resources and campus culture. Presenters will also discuss tips for medication diversion and how to help students with ADHD use medicine safely.

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Improving Student Understanding of Sexual Assault Policies and Procedures

The purpose of this session is to review findings from a multi-institutional study assessing students’ level of awareness of institutional sexual assault policies and procedures and the relationship to institutional support. In addition to broad findings, this session will discuss which students are less likely to have an understanding of these policies. This session will rely on participant discussion focused on how to better inform all students of important sexual assault information as a means for promoting positive campus climates.

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Early Colleges: Their Past, Present, and Future in Higher Education

A growing trend in the education world, Early College and Career schools challenge and redefine traditional school structures by providing seamless pathways for students to attain a high school diploma, an Associate’s degree, and career-specific workplace training and credentials upon graduation.  In this session, you will get the chance to learn about the history of Early Colleges, current best practices and trends, and implications for the future of student affairs practice.

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Research Teams and Socialization: Narratives from Doctoral Students of Color

Drawing on our personal narratives as doctoral students of color, this session will highlight how research teams serve as a site for socialization and support in our navigation through graduate education at a predominantly White institution. This program will be structured as a panel discussion and is designed to invite audience members to hear from our lived experiences of the role of research teams on our doctoral journeys. Recommendations for students, faculty, and staff in graduate education will be discussed.

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Purposeful Professional Development: Growing Developmental Capacity

Do you supervise full-time or graduate staff? Join us for this session to discuss how to target professional development toward a new full-time staff member’s developmental capacity, using concepts related to self-authorship and LPM. We will also talk about building a community of practice, and how a staff group can work better as a team. In this approach, more experienced staff members can take leadership roles within the team to increase the development of all involved. We will offer specific and concrete strategies, as well as philosophical approaches, to development that fosters developmental growth.

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Nigrescence Season

How does racial trauma contribute to the process of becoming Black? In the wake of state- sanctioned violence towards Black people, Black professionals are in a peculiar position: we are called to be social justice warriors in environments that often times, do not live out the values espoused. Join us for an interactive presentation on the experiences of Black professionals on predominantly White college campuses.

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Moving from Compliance to Commitment: Creating a Comprehensive Sexual Violence Prevention Plan from Climate Survey Results

So your school has completed a Climate Survey...now what?  Just completing a sexual assault climate study is not enough - the key to change is what you do with that information.  Rutgers University-New Brunswick used the results of their #iSpeak survey to implement an action plan for change.  Participants will have the opportunity to see what was uncovered during our climate study and what we did with that information. Come find out how Rutgers University-New Brunswick made everyone responsible for being a part of the revolution to end sexual violence on our campus.

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Understanding and Meeting the Challenges of Today’s Professional Students

Understanding the student profile and support needs of professional students uniquely challenge today’s student affairs professionals. A thorough understanding of today’s professional learner, their challenges and characteristics, will provide Student Affairs staff with better strategies for customizing higher order learning strategies and interventions, reinforcing professional and personal identity development and providing support systems for to align with the high-level expectations of the professional students. This session will focus on understanding today’s professional learners and recommend academic, professional and personal support strategies to ensure their success.

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Student Conduct, Institutional Occupation, and Controversial Speakers

This program is designed to discuss recent student movements and institutional occupations from a student conduct practitioner lens. The program will cover several case studies, including the precipitating circumstances of the occupation, the institutional action, and the resulting outcomes. The program will discuss multiple philosophies of administrative responses and where student conduct is interjected in formal and informal capacities. The program is designed for higher education and student affairs professionals who work with student behavior in any capacity.

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The Second-Year Transformational Experience Program: 4 Years and Counting . . .

In 2013 Ohio State embarked on an initiative to redefine and improve the second-year student experience called the Second-Year Transformational Experience Program. Through faculty-student interaction in weekly cohort meetings, the hope was to create a living, learning laboratory where faculty could guide students through a process of discovering themselves, developing tools for life, and building essential network connections. The program was to focus on student success and development. In our fourth year of this successful program, the learning continues.

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Collegiate Recovery 101: Supporting Students in Recovery on Your Campus

Within the current collegiate landscape, people in recovery from substance use disorders must often make the choice between protecting their recovery and attending college. Those who do pursue higher education rarely experience all that college has to offer, instead isolating to avoid situations likely to trigger a return to use. Learn what students in recovery need, the history of collegiate recovery, ways to provide recovery supports on your campus, and what resources are available to help you do this.

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Emerging Research on High-Achieving Undergraduate Black Women

This qualitative study examines the experiences of high-achieving undergraduate Black women inside and outside the classroom at an urban PWI. Intersectionality is used as a theoretical framework to analyze participants’ experiences and to consider the salience of their intersecting racial, gender, social class, and academic identities. Findings are consistent with the limited research on this topic, indicating students in this population often felt racially isolated on campus and alienated from their majority and other minority peers. They experienced racism from peers and instructors. They also felt pressured to prove themselves academically (Fries-Britt & Griffin, 2007; Strayhorn, 2009).

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Training across Developmental Levels in University Counseling Centers

This session is intended for mental health practitioners (psychologists, counselors, and social workers) as well as graduate students interested in current trends and practices occurring within training programs at university counseling centers. Focus will be given to practicum training issues, training in group therapy facilitation with doctoral interns, and postdoc training initiatives on mindfulness/meditation. If time permits, we also invite the audience to share their innovative ideas related to training.

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Establishing A Campus-Based Intercultural Leadership Institute

This session will guide participants through the more than year-long process of developing a campus-based intercultural leadership institute to increase staff multicultural competence. The session will describe all aspects of the process including forming a committee to facilitate this process, identifying a theoretical framework, setting the structure, working with an evolving curriculum, forming the cohort, facilitating the semester-long institute, creating trust and space for sharing, and projects for campus change.

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Residential Curriculum Assessment Team: A competency-based approach to assessment

The purpose of this competency-based session is to discuss both the design and value of the Residential Curriculum Assessment Team. Throughout our session, we will discuss both the methodology/data collection/data analysis we have developed to assess Residential Curriculum at a southeastern university, as well as the values/ethics/politics of RCAT. RCAT is an innovative initiative because of its collaborative approach to outcome-driven assessment in student affairs. As such, we invite all interested faculty, practitioners, and graduate students.

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From Grassroots to Shoots: A Practical Approach to Peer Mentoring

First-time college students are showing up more anxious and overwhelmed than ever. Despite so many opportunities available to them, student engagement and transition continue to be an issue. In order to combat this, we utilize traditional and transfer students as Peer Mentors in a realistic and sensible manner, while grounded in theory. Join us as we discuss with one another how and why we created our Peer Mentor Program, how we can make it better, and learn from others’ models.

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From Mentee to Mentor: Becoming a Successful Peer-Mentor

The purpose of this session is to provide an individual, student perspective of the psychosocial and academic changes that occur as students develop from mentee to mentor in a first-generation college student program, Pioneer Scholars. This presentation shares an innovative student perspective, where mentors have experienced the mentor maturation process. The process helps to define student learning and development in a co-curricular setting for first-generation college students, and developing those students as leaders for future professions.

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Mentors Aiding in Peer Success (MAPS): Implementing a Peer Mentoring Program

Learn how a volunteer peer mentor program was designed and implemented in a business college at a public four-year university. Mentors Aiding in Peer Success is a program designed to enhance the undergraduate educational experience for both mentor and mentees. Those participating will learn about the context and rationale for the program, in addition to the program’s certification through the College Reading and Learning Association. Participants will consider how components of a peer mentoring program might apply to their institutional contexts.

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Bridges: Addressing the needs of students with intellectual disabilities

Higher education has expanded to provide support for students with diverse backgrounds and abilities. With the implementation of IDEA, ADA, and significant technological advances, students with diverse disabilities are now significantly more likely to seek post-secondary education. One population that has not been afforded specialized and targeted attention are those with intellectual disabilities. This program explains Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne's comprehensive credit bearing program, called Bridges to Education, that provides multiple points of entry and exist for an individualized integrated collegiate experience.

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Building an Assessment Team to Promote a Culture of Assessment

Building a culture of assessment is a critical component to empowering your departments and your division to actively engage in good assessment practice. Whether you’re at a small or large institution, an assessment team helps build knowledge and promote a culture of shared ownership over how data is collected, shared and utilized in your division.This session will cover why you should have an assessment team, how to build one, and how to engage members.

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Innovative Approaches for Facilitating the Social Change Model

Over the past two decades, the Social Change Model of Leadership Development has transformed student leadership education on college campuses. As part of the 20th anniversary celebration, The Social Change Model: Facilitating Leadership Development was published. This interactive session will feature editors and authors who have penned new activities for teaching the Social Change Model in a variety of settings and learning environments.

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Fear the Walking Dead? How A Wellbeing Assessment Can Inform Program and Policy

Do your students seem to be like the walking dead? If so, maybe knowing more about their wellbeing will help target programs and policies! The Wake Forest Wellbeing Assessment has two defining characteristics. One is that it is theory driven. Two is that it is designed to give practical advice about wellbeing that can be addressed through program and policy. We explain the new theory developed by Wake Forest faculty and provide results from a multiple institution administration of the survey.

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If and when is a doctoral degree in my future?

Is a doctoral degree right for you? This interactive program provides an opportunity to consider doctoral education, including when and how it fits into your goals. Already decided? Now, how do you select the “right” program for you? When is the “right” time? During this session, we (faculty and doctoral students) will share practical information and strategies for considering doctoral education, timing, and program selection. The application process and other factors will be discussed, leaving time for questions.

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Sky's the limit?: Access and inclusion of students with disabilities

The sky's the limit is often used to describe the opportunities available to college students. College is the place to explore, learn, and grow as a student. But is the sky really the limit? How often do we consider ability when providing these opportunities to college students? This poster presentation explores that very concept, looks at access to opportunities and feelings of belonging on campus, and asks what will it take for the sky to be the limit for college students with disabilities.

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Don’t Be Ashamed. You’re Not an Impostor.

Ever doubted your ability to perform the duties of your position, regardless of the consistent praise you’ve received? Ever feared that your teacher, supervisor, or colleagues might discover you’re not who you present yourself to be? Afraid you’ll somehow be outed as a fraud? Perhaps you’ve worked with, or know of, someone who’s struggled with this? These thoughts and feelings are common indicators of Impostor Phenomenon (IP). Come learn about IP, the various lenses that frame the experience it, discuss experiences with IP, and best practices for coping with and overcoming it.

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Good Housekeeping: Housing Experiences Matter to LGBTQ College Student Success

On-campus housing benefits all college students, right? What about students who have to navigate coming out to their roommate? Or students who experience isolation or microaggressions on their floor as the only ‘out’ community member? Longitudinal data from the National Study of LGBTQ Student Success, coupled with authentic practitioner reflection, give workshop participants an opportunity to engage in a case study and identify ways to (re)consider housing at their home institutions.

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Partnering to Develop a Successful Regional Peer Leadership Conference

The Rocky Mountain Peer Leadership Conference is a regional conference to promote quality peer leadership training. The event is also an innovative public-private collaboration between the University of Colorado-Denver and the Peer Leader Center providing a much needed opportunity for sharing best practices in peer leadership across institutions. The conference is in its fourth year and hosts between 100-150 participants from 10-12 institutions each year. We will share how we built a successful partnership, our conference development process.

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Renovating the Master’s House When You Are the Master’s Tool: Creating Transformative Workplaces

Student Affairs practitioners navigate complex systems of advocating for social change while being agents of the institution. This responsibility includes developing and/or nurturing transformative workplaces to disrupt power dynamics. Transformative workplaces resist dominant practices of supervision and norms around work, and can be experienced as spaces of liberation and advocacy. We acknowledge navigating university politics, legitimacy, and purpose can influence one’s ability to create and sustain a transformative workplace. We will explore strategies of creating transformative workplaces and discuss how we challenge the ways we are the “Master's Tools” and become agents for liberation and social change on campus.

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When the Institution Calls: SAPs, Town Hall Discussions, & Sociopolitical Positions

In the wake of racial tensions, student affairs professionals (SAPs) are called to facilitate dialogue across campuses. Such necessary conversations can place at odds our field’s commitment to working alongside students, whose interests are sometimes seen as opposed to the institution's structures. This presentation explores the perspectives of various SAPs, who have engaged in various dialogues on campus. We discuss how our diverse sociopolitical and organizational positions influence the ways we lead, engage and manage such challenging dialogues.

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It’s Not All About Placement: Navigating Student and Employer Expectations

Given politicians’ and accreditors’ increasing focus on placement data as a metric for institutional success, how do we manage the gap between student and employer expectations for employment? Answering this question is critical to connecting students with their career path. This session highlights one institution’s attempt to assess this gap and to identify strategies for better preparing and educating both students and employers. Participants will discuss potential strategies for facilitating this relationship and long-term ideas for follow-up.

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It’s Not Just About the Money: Faculty and Staff Sharing Responsibility to Enhance Foster Youth Graduation Rates

This presentation will demonstrate the importance of developing a comprehensive plan involving faculty and staff to support foster students to achieve graduation. In 2015, 18,934 youth in the U.S. aged out of care without a permanent, legal family. At age 18, these youth are disconnected from support while attending college. These students want to graduate, but are more likely than their peers to experience homelessness or drop out of college. Stockton University supports this at-risk cohort of students in several ways: an emergency food assistance program, mental health care, medical screenings, formal mentoring, and emergency housing.

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To Interim or Not to Interim?

Filling an interim role can become a transformational opportunity for a student affairs professional at any level. It is also a decision requiring careful consideration. An interim role can come about for many reasons within an institution and can take several forms, including being located inside or outside of one’s current institution, or of one’s current functional unit. Hear the presenters discuss their experiences assuming interim positions and learn questions to ask for enabling a successful (and transformative) experience!

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Stories of Chinese International Student Resilience in the Classroom

Do you work on a campus that has experienced tremendous growth in its Chinese international student population? Do you wonder what they experience in your classrooms? Join your colleagues to learn about the challenges that Chinese international students face, and most importantly the ways in which they thrive despite these challenges. We’ll look at racism, the hegemony of the English language, and the pervasiveness of Whiteness to understand how these students often become invisible in class.

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Using Institutional Data to (Re)Structure a Queer/Trans FYE Program

Presenters will review the programmatic structure, assessment, and evaluation of a first-year experience program for LGBTQ+ students. This theory-based, data-driven FYE initiative focuses on increasing the retention and enhancing the experiences of first-year queer and trans students, using institutional success data to make decisions about programmatic structure and intervention. Presenters will share how utilizing institutional data to inform our first-year experience program has improved students’ GPAs while decreasing the amount of students on academic probation.

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Activating the Potential for Bystander Intervention on Campus

How do we encourage students living in our campus communities to be more engaged with issues of justice and wellbeing happening around them? The Study of Integrated Living Learning Programs (SILLP), now in its third year, incorporates a measure of student disposition to intervene in a bystander scenario. Using preliminary findings, this session offers implications and potential high-impact practices for student affairs professionals.

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Humanity Before Business as Usual: Lessons Learned from Mid-Level Professionals

From Orlando to Baton Rouge, Charleston to Dallas ; our world has been repeatedly impacted by tragedy after senseless tragedy. Yet in so many ways, higher education has remained stunningly silent. How can mid-level professionals utilize their positional structures to impact positive change? Where are in-roads for navigating an increasingly politically charged system? Join us to discuss challenges and opportunities across mid-levels, supervising up, leading down, and navigating inclusive relationships and team dynamics within professional cohorts.

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Concrete Ceilings: Journeys of African American SSAOs

Session panelists will share their experiences, challenges, successes, and barriers while rising above the concrete ceiling in pursuit of an SSAO position. Panelists will compare and contrast the journey and lived experiences of African American SSAOs and explore frameworks and strategies for becoming a SSAO and serving successfully in the role. Participants will learn how to seek and provide support, and create and find pipelines, and embrace our collective responsibility to lift others as we climb.

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Creating Transformational Narratives in Advising Using Career Construction Theory

At a medium sized Midwestern university that implemented required advising in 2012, practitioners were tasked to establish an advising model that was responsive to and supportive of student success. In collaboration with other campus departments, academic advising was intentionally blended with career development in a model of transformational advising. Join us to learn how a result producing initiative is being scaled to serve the university system and how you may make use of this theory based approach in your campus advising practice.

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Mentors in Admissions: Creating College Access Programming

First-generation, low-income, minoritized students often attend high schools where college advising resources are limited, yet these students aspire to earn a college degree. This session will present one university’s attempt to bring college guidance to students in need. NYU’s College Access Leadership Institute, a week long, residential summer program, supports students through the college process by building a foundation for knowledge and a community of support. Participants will learn to implement a college access program on their campus.

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Faculty Subcultures: Does Academic Rank Affect Campus Culture and Student Success?

Many have argued that student success must be a shared responsibility among members of the campus community. Understanding how faculty perceive institutional retention efforts is thus key in developing shared responsibility. This session examines the extent to which faculty at various academic ranks (tenured/promoted, promotional stream, and non-promotional) differ in their perceptions across domains, including facilitating student involvement in academic and co-curricular activities, dedicating resources and leading to promote retention objectives, and relaying information about academic and personal support services.

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Inspiring Stories of American Indian College Students: A Strengths-Based Model

This session shares results of a qualitative study with American Indian graduate students pursuing an advanced degree in student affairs/college counseling. Using a strengths-based, developmental model, interviewers identified themes associated with academic success and personal resiliency. Presenters will draw on study findings to generate discussion and recommendations for counselors and student affairs practitioners who intend to form stable mentoring relationships with Native students.

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Blueprints for Student Success: Innovating to Teach Students About Student Affairs/Services

As part of the Supporting Student Success research project, this session will engage participants in our recent youth outreach intervention, Blueprints for Student Success (www.blueprintsforstudentsuccess.com). The intervention was designed to educate high school students about the role student affairs and services (SAS) will play in their education, inform them about available supports, and provide an overview of engagement opportunities. Increasing high school students’ awareness of service areas, programs and initiatives is imperative if students are to make the most of their postsecondary experience.

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Diversifying Our Approach: Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Career Education

Ryerson University’s Career Centre has transformed its objectives and programming to be more inclusive for our diverse student population. We have challenged ourselves and our employer partners to create more inclusive spaces and strategies to effectively engage students from diverse identities and work towards their career success.

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Developing Middle Management: Strategies for Helping Them Develop and Thrive

Middle managers are essential to the success of any organization, but how can you effectively supervise and develop them? The purpose of this program is to address the evolution of middle managers in higher education, understand their necessity to the success of the organization, and ultimately find ways to help them develop their skills for their next professional step.

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“Save the Data” Using Existing Survey Data to Inform Practice

Many institutions participate in national studies such as the NSSE and HERI. The presenters will review how to identify assessment opportunities to utilize existing national survey data for an institution and at a programmatic level. Additionally, presenters will review the process for identifying assessment questions based on national study instruments, aligning the survey scales to literature, and how to utilize results to inform practice.

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Using Predictive Analytics to Identify "at-risk" International Students

There is a wealth of literature on identifying and supporting "at-risk" first-year students, however most of these studies do not take international students into consideration. Come learn how one institution used admissions data and predictive analytics to identify international students who could benefit from academic assistance. This session will provide an overview of predictive analytics, how the institution created their model, and how the institution used the results to support international students.

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Redefining Black Male Student Engagement at Predominantly White Institutions

The purpose of this study was to explore how Black male students experience academic and social integration at predominately white institutions in the southeast. Specifically, I explored how Black male students defined student engagement, how their institutions facilitated or inhibited their engagement, and explored the strategies they employ to be engaged. Through interviews with 8 Black men at a PWI, I identified the following major themes: developing a strong sense of self, giving back, Black support systems, and cultural familiarity.

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Student Development Theatre

This presentation will utilize songs and stories from musical theatre to view student development theory from a different lens. In order to share what student affairs professionals have to learn from popular musical theatre characters, Bridget will perform songs and show clips from three different musicals. Each musical theatre character will be discussed through the lens of a different student development theory.

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Latinx Network Writer’s Group: “If not us, then who will?”

This session will convey the importance of writing in developing and initiating cultural advocacy and social justice within affinity groups in higher education student affairs. ACPA’s Latinx Network introduced an effort for members to collaboratively discuss issues facing Latinx professionals considered important for student affairs knowledge and practice. From these discussions, goals for presentations and publications were developed. Members of the group will provide accounts explaining reasons for participation and how this impacted their own practitioner-scholar development and social action.

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Achievement Factors for SSAOs: Effective Leadership Then and Now

Results from research studies on SSAOs’ perceptions of the importance of their own behaviors, attitudes, skills, and knowledge from 2002 to present will be shared. Themes emerged from the literature: effective leadership, change, and connection to the institutional mission. Differences among demographic groups (race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation) will be shared and a panel of SSAOs will highlight their experiences. We will offer the demographic breakdown and are excited to share the first numbers to include LGB SSAOs.

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Cultivating Environments for Diverse Student Affairs Educators to Thrive

This session will focus on strategies to cultivate environments that nurture the work of diverse student affairs professionals. Through the use of a culturally relevant and responsive framework, participants will engage in discussions about fostering environments for diverse student affairs educators to thrive. Participants will have an opportunity to share personal successes and challenges at their institution in order to contribute to the growing discourse on the enrichment, retention, and advancement of higher education administrators and of color.

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Identity Considerations in Sexual Violence Work: An Asexual Perspective

This program will provide education and awareness for attendees about asexual college students. Specifically, the context of this program will emphasize the experiences of sexual violence against asexual colleges students. Attendees will gain knowledge for consideration and implementation to improve their campus sexual violence investigations and prevention efforts to be inclusive of asexual college students. In a workshop format participants will be able to engage in critical dialogue to understand the lived experiences of asexual students who have survived sexual violence.

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How first generation students make meaning of college access programs

Through qualitative methodology, this research built upon Cultural Wealth (Yosso, 2005, 2006) and Critical Theory (Kincheloe & McLaren, 2002) to understand how 47 first generation college students used non-profit and government funded college access programs to prepare for and gain access to college. Through the students’ stories, the findings expanded Cultural Wealth to include first generation college students, demonstrated “college uplift,” and explored new ways first generation college students challenged current college choice models.

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Rising Up: Responding to Student Demands for More Inclusive Campuses

In the past year, student groups released a list of demands at over 80 institutions. This session will highlight emerging themes of systemic and structural racism from those demands, in addition to exploring the various responses from these institutions. Through the use of data from the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) and the Culturally Engaging Campus Environments (CECE) Model, participants will discuss and share strategies on intentionally supporting the needs of racially diverse students at their institutions.

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The testimonios of Latina/o/x student affairs professionals: “Hear” to stay

Student affairs continues to face the increasing challenge of retaining professionals in the field. Studies have found that 50-60% of student affairs professionals leave the field within the first five years. Despite this alarming rate, Latinx representation in student affairs is growing and new professionals are entering the field to improve current campus climates. In this session, personal testimonios will be shared and proposed as social justice and leadership tools to help retain Latinx professionals. Participants will understand their importance.

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The Forgotten Many: Assessing Campus Climate for Low-Wage Employees

Given the scarcity of research concerning food and service workers in higher education, this program focuses on the lived experiences of low-wage workers at a regional university in North Carolina. Special consideration is taken to center the voices of the subjects and challenge previously established definitions of inclusion in higher education. The presenters will provide the audience with methods of engagement to foster meaningful and transformative dialogue with service workers at their respective institutions.

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So you think you can teach? New Practitioner Teaching Tips

For new student affairs professionals, entering the classroom as an educator for the first time can be a challenging experience. We’ve all been in classrooms as students, but that doesn’t necessarily mean we know how to be teachers. In this interactive session, participants will have an opportunity to discuss common troubles and explore possible solutions that new instructors experience. Kolb’s Theory of Experiential Learning will serve as a guide for the program, however participants will be encouraged to explore their own avenues of thought throughout our time together.

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The Other Black Students: Considering Afro-Caribbean Students in College

Too often, black students are viewed as a monolithic group. They reflect many languages, ethnicities, and nations, spanning the African diaspora. As institutions strive to better serve diverse student bodies, educators should consider the heterogeneity within groups. One group that receives minimal attention in higher education discourse is Afro-Caribbean students. This presentation highlights current scholarship about Afro-Caribbeans that can inform future research and practice to understand this emerging identity group and what their experiences are like in college.

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Cultivating Inclusive Environments: (Re)Focusing on the Assets, Skills and Knowledge of Southeast Asian American Students

Southeast Asian American (SEAA) students are too often overlooked or misunderstood within higher education settings. Typically positioned as the exception to the model minority myth, strategies to support SEAA students can run the risk of being approached through a deficit lens. Through the use of the Culturally Engaging Campus Environments (CECE) Model, this session will (re)focus the conversation about this population in ways that highlight their assets, skills, and knowledge.

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Grief and Bereavement: Moving through the process

Grief is a universal, human experience that can significantly impact the wellness and success of college students. This program provides a model for a 6-week bereavement support group on a college campus where student members integrate bereavement associated with a significant death in their lives. Participants of this workshop can expect to leave with an in-depth understanding of the model and benefit from experiential activities aimed at integrating their own grief experiences into their work as healers.

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Using the Enneagram to Transform Your Professional Development

The Enneagram is not your standard personality assessment. Instead of telling you "what" you do or "how" you do something, it is a typing assessment that goes over WHY you do something. This tradition, which began thousands of years ago, will help you live authentically, bring more value to your supervision, and transform the way you view those around you. Learn how to implement the Enneagram in your job, whether entry level or SSAO.

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“For Colored Girls” Who’ve Considered a Doctoral Degree

Not all Women of Color seek to pursue a terminal degree. Yet the narratives that drive and/or pressure Black women, specifically, to pursue the doctoral degree can be daunting. Grounded in Black feminist thought and the model of community cultural wealth, this program, through a discussion guided by the lived experiences of the presenters, reflection, and networking activities, examines the obstacles and opportunities for women of color starting and completing a doctoral degree.

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Can I Just Have A Moment?: Battling Workplace Tokenism

Tokenism is not new to higher education. With diversity being at the forefront of many mission statements, how are institutions working to ensure their community is inclusive and supportive beyond their students? What methods can be used to ensure the mental health of their diverse faculty and staff is not taking the back seat? This session will start the discussion to answer both questions, provide resources for “the only” and for those who want to be supportive of their colleagues.

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Moving Through: Second-Year Initiatives that Promote Persistence

An abundance of research exists to support students during their collegiate transition. However, strategies to support second-year students are only beginning to surface. New research, which identifies predictors of thriving in the sophomore year for students with majority and marginalized identities, must inform our practice. After learning about this research, explore Ohio State’s research-driven, campus-wide initiatives that promote persistence among second-year students, in response to the launch of a two-year residency requirement.

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Building Global Citizens in International Service-Learning Trips: What I’ve Learned

As global service-learning continues to expand throughout higher education institutions in the United States, professionals in the field must consider the impacts these programs have on the communities they serve. Global service-learning programs are meant to empower local communities; but if not carefully implemented, they can exploit host communities and become poverty tourism. Through videos, discussions, and case studies, participants will critically engage with a framework to construct ethical and empowering global service programs.

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Diversity 360: Cultivating Campus Inclusion through Community, Education, & Dialogue

Learn how CWRU staff developed a 3-hour workshop in response to student requests for campus-wide training on diversity & inclusion. Now in its 2nd year, over 3000 undergraduate and graduate students have participated in Diversity 360. Participants will learn strategies to develop a similar program on their campuses and review tips and lessons learned about content development, pedagogy, facilitator training, scheduling, assessment, and future directions for this training that has played a role in shifting campus culture.

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Predictive Analytics Demystified: Techniques and Applications

Predictive Analytics is a buzzword in higher education, but what exactly is it and how does one implement it? This presentation will describe the framework behind predictive analytics, common techniques, and how to apply it to academic advising, student services, and residence life. The presentation will conclude with a case study using real institutional data and free software. Sample code will be provided when applicable.

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Aspiring Social Justice Ally: Considerations for American Indian Student Populations

Ally identity development is a hot topic in the world of higher education for professionals who want to excel in social justice work. However, what do you do if the population you would like to be an ally for is often left out of social justice work? This presentation will tailor Keith Edwards’ Ally Identity Development Model to those aspiring to be an ally for American Indian students.

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#RealTalk: Mobilizing SAHE Graduate Students To Get Real About Race

In student affairs we espouse diversity and inclusion as professional values, but how does this play out during graduate programs? This session will present a case study related to the recruitment of students of color at the SAHE master’s program at Miami University. Attendees will engage in dialogue with panelists to identify effective strategies for mobilizing graduate students to recruit diverse candidates in Student Affairs graduate programs.

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Hands Up: Addressing Relationships between Black Collegians and Campus Police

Cases such as Alton Sterling, Philandro Castile, Tamir Rice, and Freddie Grey have brought Black and police relations to the forefront of conversation. Many of the stories that garner media attention come from still segregated communities in cities, but college campuses are no exception. Learn to be an advocate for social justice, how campus policing may be affecting Black students at your institution, and how to take responsibility for it in its role in perpetuating discrimination and oppression.

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The Power of Words: Using Inclusive Language

Words are powerful: what we say can deeply affect students we serve and colleagues with whom we work. Thus, student affairs professionals must be equipped to communicate effectively within diverse campus environments. How do we ensure our language is inclusive of various identities? In this program you will learn: 1) why using inclusive language is beneficial; 2) what commonly used words/phrases are non-inclusive and why; and 3) how to create educational moments when non-inclusive language is used in your presence.

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Meeting The Demands: The Intersection of Social Justice and Leadership

This program is designed to discuss how SJI and LEAD competencies intersect in our practice as higher education professionals at foundational, intermediate, and advanced outcome levels. The goal is to center the social justice and inclusion core competency to increase awareness regarding its application beyond the usual functional areas in student affairs. Participants will draft a plan to develop progressive experience as leaders who go beyond a commitment to inclusion and demonstrate their competence by applying socially just practices throughout their careers.

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Entry, Mid, and Senior-Level Job Searches: Finding Your Institutional Fit

A panel of professionals will share their recent experience in the job search process. Each person will describe their journey, how their values and ethics informed their process, and how they made decisions about how they would fit with the institutional culture. We have a diverse group of colleagues on the panel in terms of age, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, and career-level from a master’s student seeking her first job to a vice president moving to a larger institution.

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Communities Without Consensus: Vibrance in Resistance, Pedagogy and Oppositional Spaces

Oppositional Consciousness leads educators to dismantle oppressive policies and practices. Resistance to efforts to disrupt the status quo can be challenging, especially for educators with marginalized social identities who are often targeted. Educators build communities for support, yet rarely have the opportunity to examine these spaces that sustain and allow them to thrive. This session explores oppositional spaces that emerged for six college educators who seek to enact social justice pedagogies and offer implications for preparation and practice.

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Associated Factors of Internet Addiction among International College Students

The purpose of this study is to examine associated factors (e.g., demographic factors, students’ characteristics, academic performance, parents’ education, socio-economic status, self-esteem, and psychological well-being) to international students’ Internet addiction using quantitative method. The findings suggest that academic performance, socio-economic status, self-esteem, and psychological well-being are significant predictors of Internet addiction among international students. Lastly, psychological well-being is significantly associated with other factors such as Internet addiction, academic performance, socio-economic status, and self-esteem.

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Confronting White Supremacy with Dialogue

Whether on campus, Facebook, or over the dinner table, race is a topic that can lead to discomfort and division. In today’s highly-political climate, the skills of dialogue are more important than ever. The presenters, two self-identified white Student Affairs professionals, will provide an overview of white supremacy as a systemic problem, common pitfalls that prevent white people from effectively talking about race, as well as strategies for mindfully staying engaged in dialogue as a tool for confronting white supremacy.

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Guiding Grads: Strategies for Effective Graduate Student Supervision

Although there is significant scholarship and associated models regarding supervision for entry-level professionals in student affairs, the literature currently misses how to best supervise the field’s graduate students. We propose a framework evolved from Baxter Magolda’s (2004) Learning Partnerships Model coupled with Howell’s (1982) Conscious Competence Model that strongly complements the learning that graduate students engage in within the classroom environment and provides a more focused and intentional methodology for supervisors of graduate students.

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Rubric or Bust: Measuring Learning from Resume Reviews and Critiques

Your career center probably offers a resume review or critiquing service, but are you measuring whether students gain anything from the experience? Move beyond tracking utilization and satisfaction by learning how to apply a pretest posttest rubric design to your assessment of resume reviews. This session will showcase one center’s successes and challenges measuring the learning that occurs during a resume review. Participants will leave with the tools to create rubrics that fit their unique institutional needs.

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(In)Access to Authenticity, Vulnerability, and Empathy in Social Justice Dialogue

Student affairs educators are encouraged to meet students where they are while challenging and supporting their development, especially around issues of social justice. In this session, we will foster dialogue with participants around our (in)ability as educators to be vulnerable, authentic, and empathetic in dialogue spaces as well as critically analyze the politics of how we as facilitators of these spaces dominate, privilege, and center certain voices over others in the name of “inclusion.”

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Student Parents’ College Experiences: A Single Institutional Assessment

This study examined the experiences of student parents through student affairs professionals (SAPs)’s perspectives at Bowling Green State University. Literature has shown that student parents are often overlooked on college campuses (Mahaffey, Hungerford, & Sill, 2015). Three interviews were conducted with SAPs. Results demonstrated concerns over a lack of resources for student parents; suggestions for improvement were provided. This project will contribute to the audiences’ understanding of the Assessment, Evaluation, and Research, and Social Justice and Inclusion professional competencies.

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Collaboration for Maximum Impact: Educating Current and Future Professionals on LGBTQ+ Inclusion

According to Day and Schoenrade (2000), when top management supports equal rights in the workplace, LGBT employees have more affection for the job, higher satisfaction rates, and less conflicts at work and at home. By focusing on extending collaborative efforts and reaching a wider audience through established successful programming, the Career Development Center sought to educate not only current LGBT students, but current and future HR professionals, community members and faculty and staff. This interactive session features best practice approaches to targeting a wider audience, especially for raising awareness of issues impacting our diverse students.

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Asian American College Students’ Academic Experiences and Depression

The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between various factors related academic experiences and depression for Asian American students. Asian American college students reported the highest level of depression among all racial groups while White students scored the lowest in depression. Asian American was the group who spent the most time on studying or work on homework while African American student spent the least time on studying. For predictors of depression, hours spent on studying or homework and failed to complete homework on time were significant predictors of depression for Asian American.

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No Brain, No Gain: Brain Research Refining Student Development Theory

This session introduces recent discoveries from brain imaging studies to further enhance understanding of the development of adolescent students. Participants will review past arguments about the influence of cognitive and psychosocial factors on decision making and judgment; more recent values-based leadership engagement process (Social Change Model); and toward a mindfulness practice to help the brain develop and students to thrive. Learn and share the effects on student affairs work with Orientation, parents, leadership development, student conduct, and behavioral consultation teams.

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FIRE: First-year Innovation and Research Experience

How do we engage today’s students? How can we provide authentic academic and social experiences? The Paul College of Business and Economics piloted an innovative first year experience program as an expansion of what was a traditional first year experience course. The First-year Innovation and Research Experience (FIRE) is an integrated, team-based, and game-like experience guided by peer and alumni mentors. The program initiative was to build a community of engaged student learners and we succeed!

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Understanding, Advising,and Advocating for LatinX Undocumented Students

Have you thought about how to better serve your Latinx undocumented student population? Have you ever thought about how LatinX students navigate differently through their identities and throughout their entire collegiate journey? This session will give you the opportunity to learn about different social identities and participate in an open dialogue about the current population of LatinX college students. Furthermore, attendees will learn how to foster intentional and meaningful relationships with LatinX college students to aid in their personal and professional development.

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Supporting Job-Seeking International Students: Best Practices for Career Services Professionals

International students are attending American colleges and universities in record-setting numbers - are you ready to support them through the job search process? Come to this session to learn about the realities of H1B visa sponsorship and the impact this has on international students seeking U.S. employment. This session will help career advising staff learn and share culturally competent best practices around advising international students, and provide opportunities for experiential learning through multiple case studies.

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Creating Supportive Environments for Foster Youth, Homeless, & Unaccompanied Students

A stereotypical move-in includes parents and children toting loads of gear into residence halls, ending with lingering hugs. But for former foster youth, homeless, and unaccompanied students, it can be a lonely and isolating experience. College can be difficult for any student, and especially so for those who do not have familial supports. This session will share research and strategies to understand and meet these students’ needs. Promising practices and case studies will equip participants with ideas to apply.

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Build It, They Will Come: Campus-wide Programming for Student Parents

For students who have children, opportunities to engage in activities outside of the classroom may be limited if children are not able to participate. This session explains development of campus-wide family programming. To enhance applicability of the programs across institutions, the session will explain how to take specific programs and facilitate them using a low cost/no cost model. The session will conclude with a question and answer session and opportunity for attendees to share best practices from their institutions.

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Utilizing Racial Caucusing in Leadership Training at a Mission-Driven Institution

What Must Be Done? The quintessential Vincentian question and DePaul University mission calls for a collective commitment to creating an inclusive and explicitly anti-racist campus community. Racial Caucusing can be a powerful tool in exploring dynamics of racial identity, privilege, power and oppression in service of increased self-understanding, coalition building and social justice. This interactive session will utilize a case study to review key considerations for developing and executing racial causing in student leader training.

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Transforming Collaboration through Meaning Making: The Broncos FIRST Project

This program introduces the mentor experiences of a first year student success program using social validity to determine meaning making for mentors. Using semi structured interview data, this presentation shares findings that provide insight into program development, recruitment and mentor matching, program effectiveness, meaning making for stakeholders, and the perceived benefits these programs offer to mentors and students. Participants will engage in discussions on engaging community constituents as partners in student success.

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Informed and Intentional Support for Muslim Students on Campus

Administrators strive to make their campuses an inclusive and welcoming environment for all students. College may be one of the only open, safe, and inclusive environments for many Muslim students as they may face scrutiny, judgement, hate, and even physical harm in other settings due to the current Islamophobic rhetoric in America and online. This session will provide basic information about Muslims’ beliefs, diversity, traditions, and daily nuances to those working to provide informed and intentional support for Muslim students.

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Rethinking Recognition: Using a Values Framework to Recognize and Promote Best Practices in Student Organizations

Do you know the learning outcomes for your organization awards? Have you ever wondered how to transform the best practices of winning groups into community-wide change? Attendees will learn how Denison University flipped the outdated model of once-a-year awards to completely redesign the recognition program for student groups. This presentation will explore our theory-to-practice and values-based approach to program assessment that produced a program that celebrates and rewards the creative and innovative ideas that student organizations are doing.

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HBCU Institute: The Current State of Affairs at Black Colleges

This session brings together an esteemed panel of researchers and practitioners interested in the continued success of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs). We will reexamine the historical relevance of HBCUs, current trends from HBCU research and best practices for addressing contemporary issues affecting HBCUs. Join the panelists as they share their expertise, experiences and recommendations about topics ranging from building community to staff retention, from student access to success. Attendees will be invited to engage in the conversation through dialogue with panelists.

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The Importance of Representation of East-Asians in Student Affairs

The percentage of Asian/Pacific Islander (API) students in higher education has increased 3-fold since 1976. Institutional attempts to address staff/faculty diversity rarely reflect the diversity of the populations they serve. In this session, audience members will learn about the sparse literature on API student affairs and API professionals will discuss their experiences in working with API students. We will conclude with recommendations to address this burgeoning need and present planned scholarly works.

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(Dis)ability Digital exclusion: Reaching beyond social media to the unengaged student.

On average, there are 700 Instagram photos uploaded, 7,000 Tweets, and 52,000 likes on Facebook every second. Social media has created a world where it's necessary to use technology to communicate. With the increased use of social media in the field, digital inclusion is an essential social responsibility. This poster session will: 1) identify online environmental barriers that affect the disability community, 2) distinguish which social media sites are not accessible and 3) provide strategies for professionals to be digitally inclusive.

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International Students and Academic/Behavioral Misconduct: Questions, Issues, Strategies

While adapting to university can be difficult for anyone (Gerdes & Mallinckrodt, 1994), international students often experience even greater challenges with adjustment (Gebhard, 2012; Kambouropoulos, 2014). Standards governing conduct are culturally specific and thus may differ from country to country. Further, the consequences for international students found responsible for policy violations may involve their legal status in the host country. Panelists from Canada and the U.S. will discuss this critical issue affecting international student success and consider implications for policy/practice.

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Research in Practice Strategies to Increase Student Retention

With more privatized housing complexes being constructed close to campus and current student being attracted to some of these facilities’ amenities, retention to campus housing for Sophomore and above students is even more critical for their success. Participants in this session will learn how to easily and seamlessly infuse research-in-practice methods that inform marketing efforts that can increase retention to on-campus housing. While the focus of this session centers on housing, concepts covered are easily translatable across student affairs.

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LGB Intersections with Interfaith: A “Ready” Opportunity

This program will explain the Interfaith Diversity Experiences and Attitudes Longitudinal Study (IDEALS) and share knowledge and skills around interfaith work, the intersection of faith and spirituality with LGB identity, and the probable interfaith expectations of students by institution type. Participants will learn how "ready" for interfaith experiences are the students at their institution type, any differences seen for the LGB population, and discuss promising practices for engaging LGB students in interfaith spaces on their campuses.

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Dispelling the Myths of working at a Religiously-Affiliated Institution

A panel of professionals with showcase their experience and knowledge with working at religiously affiliated institutions. The panelists will focus on their experiences, providing a primer to religious institutions and exploring how student affairs functions within these environments by examining critical student affairs topical issues and how these are seen at these institutions. In addition, the panel will highlight the importance of understanding mission and the way that religion plays a role in guiding an institution. This is a neglected piece in understanding religiously affiliated institutions.

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Dialogue-based, community-learning as a curriculum model for LGBTQ+ allyship program

This session will discuss the creation and evolution of the Allies & Safe Zones program at Florida State University. This is an LGBTQ+ allyship program whose curriculum is based in small and large group discussion, interactive activities, and lecture is used sparsely to reinforce large topics. Highlights shared: employs every learning style, engages every level of LGBTQ+ competency, and is built a foundation of how to best understand and how to interact with the current LGBTQ+ community.

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Attitudinal bias about disability on campus and in career

There are laws about accommodations for employees and students with disabilities, but are we being as inclusive as we think? Literature shows students with disabilities are not receiving accommodations or the same resume-building opportunities. Other publications refer to people with disabilities having difficulty in their careers due to attitudinal bias. Come hear about the available literature, informally examine the attitudinal bias on your campus, and discuss what can be done to dismantle the barriers we continue to build.

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BACK IN THE CLOSET: Navigating the “Invisible” [email protected]/x LGBTQ+ community

This session will explore the existing landscape of the LGBTQ+ [email protected]/x community through a practitioners lens. The PULSE nightclub shooting catapulted the LGBTQ+ [email protected]/x community in the U.S. posing the question: What are we doing in Higher Education to support this group of students who attend colleges and institutions? Using historical context, student development theory, ethnic, and sexual identity, participants will learn how these processes influenced the current landscape today, including recommendations of best practices and reflection.

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Creating Black queer space in college: Implications for student affairs educators

This session introduces participants to key findings from a multi-year critical ethnography that explores the worldmaking practices engaged by Black queer graduate and undergraduate men in college. The session unearths the sociocultural formations produced by Black queer men as they carve out (counter)space in an effort to resist homonormativity, heterosexism, and homophobic racism across postsecondary context. The presenter identifies implications for student affairs practice and policy. Participants will be encouraged to articulate innovative approaches to augment campus climates for LGBT students of color, specifically Black queer men.

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Give Students a Competitive Advantage with Help from Volunteers

This session will discuss the Career Intensive Boot Camp Program, a 2.5-day experience for juniors, seniors, and recent post-graduates at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania to learn how to leverage their skills and experiences to not only get a job, but to be successful in their transition from student to professional. The primary focus of this session is to showcase how colleges and universities can prepare students for personal and professional success and utilize alumni volunteers and organizational partners to guide and mentor students.

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Shades of Gray: Nuances of Working with Departments across Campus

In an era of competing priorities and scarce resources the Student Affairs professional needs to build collaboration among colleagues to get “stuff” done. This session will focus on working collaboratively to accomplish individual and collective goals. Strategies covered will include how to develop a sense of shared enterprise and to avoid pitfalls that wreak havoc on candid dialogue and teamwork.

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Barriers and Bias: the Status for Women in Leadership

Though women earn more degrees than men, a gender leadership gap permeates college campuses across the country. Since 1881, the American Association of University Women (AAUW) has promoted women’s leadership and equality. This workshop will present findings from AAUW’s latest research report, Barriers and Bias: the Status for Women in Leadership, and will engage participants in a discussion around the climate for women leaders on campus. AAUW staff will provide recommendations on how to tackle the gender leadership gap and share how faculty and staff can use our research, programs, and tools to make a change.

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Native American Student Identity and Culturally Appropriate Support

Some institutions have large native student populations, while others have just a handful. Providing proper support to any size Native student population can make that population grow and become more successful. This workshop provides a rare opportunity to gain cultural competency in working with Native American students. Presenters include current Native students, faculty, and student affairs professionals who research Native student identity and have established highly successful native student support programs. The workshop includes interactive presentations, panel discussions, and activities focused on native student identity, native student experiences, and how to support Native students for increased recruitment and retention.

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A Social Justice Approach to Disability in Higher Education

This half-day workshop is designed to provide student affairs practitioners with an understanding of disability in higher education from a social justice perspective as well as the skills to use this perspective in their work. Using an interactive approach from principles of Universal Design of Instruction, the co-presenters will both present and demonstrate ways in which a social justice approach to understanding disability can enhance effective student affairs practice with disabled individuals. Using their recent publication, Disability in Higher Education: A Social Justice Approach, the co-presenters will ground this workshop in theoretical understandings of disability and universal design of instruction.

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How to Get the Job Using a Strengths-Based Approach

Are you currently looking to make a career move? We have found that many interviewees lean on "classic" answers to interview questions and are unable to articulate what sets them apart from the crowd. In this session, you will gain valuable insight from two Gallup Certified Strengths Coaches on interviewing techniques that highlight your natural talents. Knowing your Top 5 Themes from StrengthsFinder will be helpful but not mandatory to gain insight from this session.

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Responding to OCR's DCL on Transgender Students: A Gender Inclusive Facilities Policy

On May 13, 2016, in response to national discussion around transgender rights, the Office of Civil Rights issued the Dear Colleague Letter on transgender students requiring educational institutions to treat students consistent with their gender identity. One aspect of this guidance concerned allowing transgender people to use facilities, such as restrooms and locker rooms, consistent with their gender identity. This presentation will discuss one campus's response to this guidance.

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Outcomes of Leadership Certificate Course Assessment

The Undergraduate Certificate in Leadership Studies at Florida State University was developed through a partnership between the College of Education and the Center for Leadership and Social Change, which is an 18 credit, interdisciplinary, and experiential program open to develop undergraduate student leadership capacity. This qualitative research aimed to assess whether the offered leadership certificate courses achieved their learning outcomes. Findings from data analysis will give insights for the leadership education program at FSU as well as for other institutions.

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Legislative Update

Perhaps more than any other time in recent memory, the legislative landscape shaping student affairs practice is shifting and uncertain. In this session for senior student affairs officers, Dr. John Wesley Lowery examine legislative, regulatory, and executive actions in Washington and explore the implications for practice. Legislative trends at the state level will also be discussed.

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Major Key Alert: Adversity. How Transforming Mindsets Of Transfer Students Experiencing Adversity Can Improve Success Rates at 4-year Institutions.

Student Affairs practitioners are constantly tasked with finding solutions to the issue of attrition in the collegiate environment. Additionally, positive psychology, with regards to grit and mindset has become an increasingly important conversation in the education community. Melding these two ideas has had theoretical application but little work has been done in this specific area (Banyard & Cantor, 2004; Strayhorn, 2015). This poster proposes assessing student “grit scores” and teaching “growth mindset”/resiliency to transfer students who face adversity in the transition to college. I believe that using these empirically based ideas in the context of the transfer student population will yield positive results for their retention and success rates.

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Photography 101: Creating Better Images for Marketing, Publication and Web

This session will focus on photography tips to help you create great images for any use at your university. The best part is you don't need a $5,000 fancy camera setup, just your smart phone! We will cover tips for producing better images including editing, composition, production and the basics of creating images people are more likely to engage with.

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Creating Easy Advertisements, Designs, Presentations & Social Media Images with Canva!

Do you struggle to create effective and appealing advertisements for your department, office, or social media accounts? Do you wish your students could be more creative when they advertise for programming? Want to up your presentation design skills? Meet Canva. Canva is a free website that makes designing easy and enables you to create posters, ads, Facebook banners, Twitter covers, presentations, and more with ease! Learn how to use Canva, and you'll never use clipart again.

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#Hashtag 101 - The what, why and how of event hashtags

This session will introduce ACPA attendees to the concept of an event hashtag and encourage them to participate in a backchannel, using the #ACPA17 experience as a practical example. Although social media participation may seem ubiquitous to tech savvy professionals, some ACPA members are reluctant or slow adopters of this technology. This session is an attempt to meet those ACPA members where they are by offering a basic level welcome into the world of hashtags. Participants will learn key concepts and definitions, such as hashtag, backchannel, trending, etc.

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#Hashtag 101 - The what, why and how of event hashtags

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Best Practices for Managing Departmental Social Media Accounts

This session will introduce ACPA attendees to the concept of an event hashtag and encourage them to participate in a backchannel, using the #ACPA17 experience as a practical example. Although social media participation may seem ubiquitous to tech savvy professionals, some ACPA members are reluctant or slow adopters of this technology. This session is an attempt to meet those ACPA members where they are by offering a basic level welcome into the world of hashtags. Participants will learn key concepts and definitions, such as hashtag, backchannel, trending, etc.

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Social Media Communities As Brave Spaces/Wrestling With Self­Care

Do you manage the social media accounts for your office or department? This Genius Lab will teach you how to effectively use various social media sites by going over the best times to post, how frequently to post, and other tips and tricks to get students engaging with your department online.

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Summarizing your Student Engagement Data using Pivot Tables

This program will serve to explain the creation and maintenance of an exclusively­-online community (utilizing social media platforms), highlighting an already­-existing interest­-based Facebook Group as a model. It will also serve to offer suggestions for student affairs professionals seeking to create and maintain these online communities for students, faculty, or administrators at their respective institutions.

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Photography 101: Creating Better Images for Marketing, Publication and Web

Demographic summaries, grade reports, housing counts, and tutoring visits are common summary reports that are created by student affairs professionals. While one can use the formulas in Excel to create these summaries, that approach is less efficient than using pivot tables. Come learn how you can use pivot tables to summarize your student engagement data.

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Interview Like a Star

This session will focus on photography tips to help you create great images for any use at your university. The best part is you don't need a $5,000 fancy camera setup, just your smart phone! We will cover tips for producing better images including editing, composition, production and the basics of creating images people are more likely to engage with.

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Should I stay or should I go?: Knowing when to move on from a role

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Embracing the Cyclical Nature of our Work

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